Online courses directory (147)

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Starts : 2015-04-26
No votes
Coursera Free Closed [?] English & Literature English Arts Audio Education Film Humanities Music

Shakespeare in Community will introduce a broad audience of learners to Shakespeare, as we collectively read, watch, and engage four plays: Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, and The Tempest.

No votes
Study.com Free Closed [?] English & Literature EPA High School

Build your earth science vocabulary and learn about cycles of matter and types of sedimentary rocks through the Education Portal course Earth Science 101: Earth Science. Our series of video lessons and accompanying self-assessment quizzes can help you boost your scientific knowledge ahead of the Excelsior Earth Science exam . This course was designed by experienced educators and examines both science basics, like experimental design and systems of measurement, and more advanced topics, such as analysis of rock deformation and theories of continental drift.

No votes
Study.com Free Closed [?] English & Literature EPA High School

Build your earth science vocabulary and learn about cycles of matter and types of sedimentary rocks through the Education Portal course Earth Science 101: Earth Science. Our series of video lessons and accompanying self-assessment quizzes can help you boost your scientific knowledge ahead of the Excelsior Earth Science exam . This course was designed by experienced educators and examines both science basics, like experimental design and systems of measurement, and more advanced topics, such as analysis of rock deformation and theories of continental drift.

No votes
Study.com Free Closed [?] English & Literature EPA High School

Build your earth science vocabulary and learn about cycles of matter and types of sedimentary rocks through the Education Portal course Earth Science 101: Earth Science. Our series of video lessons and accompanying self-assessment quizzes can help you boost your scientific knowledge ahead of the Excelsior Earth Science exam . This course was designed by experienced educators and examines both science basics, like experimental design and systems of measurement, and more advanced topics, such as analysis of rock deformation and theories of continental drift.

No votes
Study.com Free Closed [?] English & Literature EPA High School

Build your earth science vocabulary and learn about cycles of matter and types of sedimentary rocks through the Education Portal course Earth Science 101: Earth Science. Our series of video lessons and accompanying self-assessment quizzes can help you boost your scientific knowledge ahead of the Excelsior Earth Science exam . This course was designed by experienced educators and examines both science basics, like experimental design and systems of measurement, and more advanced topics, such as analysis of rock deformation and theories of continental drift.

Starts : 2014-10-06
No votes
FutureLearn Free Closed [?] English & Literature College Writing University of Reading Writing

Learn how to use English for study at university or college and develop your writing skills, vocabulary and grammar.

Starts : 2004-09-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Computer Sciences Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

The Acoustics of Speech and Hearing is an H-Level graduate course that reviews the physical processes involved in the production, propagation and reception of human speech. Particular attention is paid to how the acoustics and mechanics of the speech and auditory system define what sounds we are capable of producing and what sounds we can sense. Areas of discussion include:

  1. the acoustic cues used in determining the direction of a sound source,
  2. the acoustic and mechanical mechanisms involved in speech production and
  3. the acoustic and mechanical mechanism used to transduce and analyze sounds in the ear.

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Starts : 2008-02-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] English & Literature Comparative Media Studies/Writing Education English English Composition English Language English Literature

This course is a workshop for students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or others', in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate.

Starts : 2005-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course focuses on phonological phenomena that are sensitive to morphological structure, including base-reduplicant identity, cyclicity, level ordering, derived environment effects, opaque rule interactions, and morpheme structure constraints. In the recent OT literature, it has been claimed that all of these phenomena can be analyzed with a single theoretical device: correspondence constraints, which regulate the similarity of lexically related forms (such as input and output, base and derivative, base and reduplicant).

Starts : 2009-02-01
18 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as to which topics to cover.

This year, we will focus on topics having to do with modality, conditionals, tense, and aspect.

Starts : 2007-02-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Foreign Languages Global Studies and Languages MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course is for advanced students who wish to build confidence and skills in spoken English. It focuses on the appropriate oral presentation of material in a variety of professional contexts: group discussions, classroom explanations and interactions, and theses/research proposals. It is valuable for those who intend to teach or lecture in English and includes language laboratory assignments. The goal of the workshop is to develop effective speaking and listening skills for academic and professional contexts.

Starts : 2007-02-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is a continuation of 24.951. This semester the course topics of interest include movement, phrase structure, and the architecture of the grammar.

Starts : 2007-02-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Foreign Languages Global Studies and Languages MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Analysis and practice of various forms of scientific and technical writing, from memos to journal articles. Strategies for conveying technical information to specialist and non-specialist audiences. Comparable to 21W.780 but methods designed to deal with special problems of advanced ELS or bilingual students. The goal of the workshop is to develop effective writing skills for academic and professional contexts. Models, materials, topics and assignments vary from semester to semester.

Starts : 2007-02-01
18 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Foreign Languages Global Studies and Languages MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This workshop is designed to help you write clearly, accurately and effectively in both an academic and a professional environment. In class, we analyze various forms of writing and address problems common to advanced speakers of English. We will often read one another's work.

Starts : 2004-02-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free English & Literature Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Urban Studies and Planning

The purpose of this seminar is to expose the student to a number of different types of writing that one may encounter in a professional career. The class is an opportunity to write, review, rewrite and present a point of view both orally and in written form. 
 

Starts : 2003-09-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] English & Literature Literature MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres - reports, captivity narratives, essays, novels, poetry, drama, and film. Some of the earlier authors we will read are Michel Montaigne, William Shakespeare, Jean de Léry, Daniel Defoe and Mary Rowlandson; more recent authors include Derek Walcott, and J. M. Coetzee.

Starts : 2003-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] English & Literature Literature MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and in-class reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate.

Starts : 2013-09-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free English & Literature Literature MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel.

Starts : 2006-02-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free English & Literature History MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This subject is devoted to reading and discussing basic American historical texts that are often cited but often remain unread, understanding their meaning, and assessing their continuing significance in American culture. Since it is a "Communications Intensive" subject, 21H.105 is also dedicated to improving students' capacities to write and speak well. It requires a substantial amount of writing, participation in discussions, and individual presentations to the class.

1 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free English & Literature Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This course will be beneficial if you wish to learn how to communicate with the sounds and music of American English. The purpose is not to increase your vocabulary, nor to improve your grammar, but to deal with the sounds of the words that you speak. Your message is of primary importance, but it may not be understood if your pronunciation is imprecise, inconsistent, or regional. This course is particularly useful for actors or for others who need to speak to diverse audiences, such as when giving a business presentation. You will have the flexibility of time to experience, at your own pace, aural and visual aspects of a sound. Within the course, students are assessed on their ability to recognize each sound in a variety of contexts and are given feedback on their particular answers. You will learn to: Articulate sounds and words using the dialect of Standard American English. Listen and think in terms of symbols for sounds, using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Use the International Phonetic Alphabet to transcribe from the Roman alphabet into the forty-four sounds of Standard American Dialect and vice versa. Analyze texts for phrasing, operative words, intonational patterns, degrees of stress. Achieve a proper use of weak forms for certain parts of speech in the English Language, making your speech clear and efficient.