Online courses directory (29)

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1 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free English & Literature Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This course will be beneficial if you wish to learn how to communicate with the sounds and music of American English. The purpose is not to increase your vocabulary, nor to improve your grammar, but to deal with the sounds of the words that you speak. Your message is of primary importance, but it may not be understood if your pronunciation is imprecise, inconsistent, or regional. This course is particularly useful for actors or for others who need to speak to diverse audiences, such as when giving a business presentation. You will have the flexibility of time to experience, at your own pace, aural and visual aspects of a sound. Within the course, students are assessed on their ability to recognize each sound in a variety of contexts and are given feedback on their particular answers. You will learn to: Articulate sounds and words using the dialect of Standard American English. Listen and think in terms of symbols for sounds, using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Use the International Phonetic Alphabet to transcribe from the Roman alphabet into the forty-four sounds of Standard American Dialect and vice versa. Analyze texts for phrasing, operative words, intonational patterns, degrees of stress. Achieve a proper use of weak forms for certain parts of speech in the English Language, making your speech clear and efficient.

2 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Life Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

You probably have a general understanding of how your body works. But do you fully comprehend how all of the intricate functions and systems of the human body work together to keep you healthy? This course will provide that insight. By approaching the study of the body in an organized way, you will be able to connect what you learn about anatomy and physiology to what you already know about your own body. By taking this course, you will begin to think and speak in the language of the domain while integrating the knowledge you gain about anatomy to support explanations of physiological phenomenon. The course focuses on a few themes that, when taken together, provide a full view of what the human body is capable of and of the exciting processes going on inside of it. The themes are: Structure and function of the body, and the connection between the two. Homeostasis, the body’s natural tendency to maintain a stable internal environment. Levels of Organization, the major levels of organization in the human organism from the chemical and cellular levels to the tissues, organs and organ systems. Integration of Systems, concerning which systems are subsets of larger systems, and how they function together in harmony and conflict. Developed with best practices in applied learning theory, this course offers an active learning experience for any student in the form of pre-tests, ample practice opportunities, 3D interactive images, walkthrough videos, and other special tools and applications that will increase your comprehension of anatomy and physiology. Ultimately, your understanding of the material offered in this course will provide you with a solid foundation to explore careers in the health and fitness industries.

2 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Foreign Languages Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This is a mini-course for individuals with no proficiency or extremely limited knowledge of Arabic language and culture who are about to begin study or work in an Arabic-speaking context. The course will introduce learners to basic concepts and information to facilitate entry and engagement in an Arabic-speaking environment.

4 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Business Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This course provides an introduction to exploring and understanding arguments by explaining what the parts of an argument are, and how to break arguments into their parts and create diagrams to show how those parts relate to each other. Argument diagramming is a great visual tool for evaluating claims that people make. By the end of the course, you will be able to think critically about arguments or claims and determine whether or not they are logical. This skill can be used in a variety of situations, such as listening to the news, reading an article, or making a point in a meeting. This is an introductory course and may be useful to a broad range of students.

4 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Life Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This is an introductory course in biochemistry, designed for both biology and chemical engineering majors. A consistent theme in this course is the development of a quantitative understanding of the interactions of biological molecules from a structural, thermodynamic, and molecular dynamic point of view. A molecular simulation environment provides the opportunity for you to explore the effect of molecular interactions on the biochemical properties of systems. This course assumes that students have taken introductory chemistry, including basic thermodynamics, as well as introductory organic chemistry. An introductory biology course is not a prerequisite for the course, but students would benefit from some prior exposure to biology, even at the high school level. Required mathematical skills include simple algebra and differential calculus.

No votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Mathematics Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This course provides an introduction to causal and statistical reasoning. After taking this course, students will be better prepared to make rational decisions about their own lives and about matters of social policy. They will be able to assess criticallyeven if informallyclaims that they encounter during discussions or when considering a news article or report. A variety of materials are presented, including Case Studies where students are given the opportunity to examine a causal claim, and the Causality Lab, a virtual environment to simulate the science of causal discovery. Students have frequent opportunities to check their understanding and practice their skills. This course is meant to serve students in several situations. One, it is meant for students who will only take one such research methods course, and are interested in gaining basic skills that will help them to think critically about claims they come across in their daily lives, such as through a news article. Two, it is meant for students who will take a few statistics courses in service of a related field of study. Three, it is meant for students interested in the foundations of quantitative causal models: called Bayes Networks.

No votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Computer Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This course presents material in discrete mathematics and computation theory with a strong emphasis on practical algorithms and experiential learning. Discrete mathematics, also called finite mathematics or decision mathematics, is the study of mathematical structures that are fundamentally discrete in the sense of not supporting or requiring the notion of continuity. Objects studied in finite mathematics are largely countable sets such as integers, finite graphs, and formal languages. Concepts and notations from discrete mathematics are useful to study or describe objects or problems in computer algorithms and programming languages. The CDM course is currently under development and we are making the course available while it is under development. Only one of the planned fifteen modules is currently available. The module on Groups that is currently available would appear mid-way through the complete course.

3 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Foreign Languages Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

Elementary French I is a carefully sequenced and highly interactive presentation of French language and culture in a media-rich course environment including new video shot in France and Québec with young professional actors. It is designed to be used as a full course of study. To successfully use this course, you should be a motivated student with a sincere desire to learn about French language and francophone cultures, and be comfortable with computer technologies. The time commitment will typically average 6-8 hours per week. For information on studying French online vs. in person, see Who should study French Online? [1] in the course introduction. You will be prompted to create an account to access the course introduction, but you may click the “Look Inside” button to view the course without creating an account. [1] https://oli.cmu.edu/jcourse/webui/guest/activity.do?context=66b0f47680020ca600d89b07ced3c385

3 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Foreign Languages Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

Elementary French II is a carefully sequenced and highly interactive presentation of French language and culture in a media-rich course environment including new video shot in France and Québec with young professional actors. It is designed to be used as a full course of study. To successfully use this course, you should be a motivated student with a sincere desire to learn about French language and francophone cultures, and be comfortable with computer technologies. The time commitment will typically average 6-8 hours per week. For information on studying French online vs. in person, see Who should study French Online? [1] in the course introduction. You will be prompted to create an account to access the course introduction, but you may click the “Look Inside” button to view the course without creating an account. [1] https://oli.cmu.edu/jcourse/webui/guest/activity.do?context=66b1239a80020ca600b009b100c1fc79

2 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Foreign Languages Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

Spanish I can be adapted for a hybrid delivery system or solely distance delivery. The course is media-rich and interactive, driven by video that was shot on-site in Guadalajara, Mexico. Versions are available for low-cost use by instructor-led classes of enrolled students. To successfully use this course, you should be a motivated student with a sincere desire to learn the Spanish language and about cultures in the Spanish-speaking world, and be comfortable with computer technologies. The time commitment will typically average 8 hours per week.

1 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free General & Interdisciplinary Studies Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

In this course you will learn how to conduct research using empirical methods, which rely on observation and experimentation. This course is appropriate for those interested in using empirical research methods in their field, particularly students in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include the formulation of the question to be investigated and the of resulting hypotheses, the collection of data and the analysis of the data collected, and the interpretation and study of analysis results. We assume that learners entering Empirical Research Methods (ERM) have taken at least a semester or year-long course in statistics and, through this or some other experience, have been exposed to the following concepts: Random Variables Population and Samples Data Tables (rows=sample units and columns=variables) Summary Statistics: Mean, Median, Variance, Covariance, Correlation Graphs: Boxplots, Barcharts, Histograms, Scatterplots Inference: standard errors, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, etc. Models: Bivariate Regression, perhaps ANOVA If learners have not had such exposure, they can follow the appropriate links into the OLI introductory statistics course to review the required concepts.

2 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Engineering Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

Statics is the study of methods for quantifying the forces between bodies. Forces are responsible for maintaining balance and causing motion of bodies, or changes in their shape. You encounter a great number and variety of examples of forces every day, such as when you press a button, turn a doorknob, or run your hands through your hair. Motion and changes in shape are critical to the functionality of man-made objects as well as objects the nature. Statics is an essential prerequisite for many branches of engineering, such as mechanical, civil, aeronautical, and bioengineering, which address the various consequences of forces. This course contains many interactive elements, including: simulations; “walk-throughs” that integrate voice and graphics to explain a procedure or a difficult concept; and, most prominently, computer tutors in which students practice problem solving with hints and feedback. This course uses algebra and trigonometry and is suitable for use with either calculus- or non-calculus-based academic statics courses. Completion of a beginning physics course is helpful for success in statics, but not required. Many key physics concepts are included in this course.

No votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and skills of evidence-based practice. The course is directly relevant to students who would like to improve the quality and outcome of their decision-making. Managers and consultants are required to take action based on their decisions, and such decisions may have profound impacts on employees, customers and clients, the organization and society more widely. But how good are such decisions? How can we ensure that managers and consultants get hold of, accurately interpret and make use of the best available evidence in their decision-making? This course will help students develop the practical skills managers and consultants need to bring evidence-based approaches to their organization. In the process of developing these skills you will also find out a lot about management research.

No votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Health and Welfare Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This course offers an overview of healthcare, health information technology, and health information management systems. The focus is on the role and responsibilities of entry-level health IT specialists in each phase of the health information management systems lifecycle. The curriculum is aligned to the new Certified Associate in Healthcare Information and Management Systems (CAHIMS) [1] certification administered by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. This certificate is designed for students who have previous experience in IT or healthcare and it is designed to serve as a pathway into health IT careers. This course is a collaborative effort of TAACCCT grantees, in particular Bellevue Colleges and MoHealthWINs. The collaborative partners supporting the development of this course are Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Stanford University and Carnegie Mellon University, Center for Applied Science and Technology (CAST), and Creative Commons (CC)- all funded through the Gates foundation OPEN Grant. The core development team includes content experts, learning scientists, software developers, instructional designers, universal design for learning experts and instructional technologists. [1] http://www.himss.org/health-it-certification/cahims?navItemNumber=13646

2 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Life Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This introductory course defines biology and its relationship to other sciences. We examine the overarching theories of life from biological research and also explore the fundamental concepts and principles of the study of living organisms and their interaction with the environment. We will examine how life is organized into hierarchical levels; how living organisms use and produce energy; how life grows, develops, and reproduces; how life responds to the environment to maintain internal stability; and how life evolves and adapts to the environment. This course is a part of our Community College (CC-OLI) series. Courses in this series are particularly well-suited to the needs of introductory community college courses, but are open for use by any instructor or student.

2 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Life Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This is a complete course in chemical stoichiometry, which is a set of tools chemists use to count molecules and determine the amounts of substances consumed and produced by reactions. The course is set in a scenario that shows how stoichiometry calculations are used in real-world situations. The list of topics (see below) is similar to that of a high school chemistry course, although with a greater focus on reactions occurring in solution and on the use of the ideas to design and carry out experiments. Note: Our chemistry courses are about to be improved and expanded! Thanks to upcoming support from the NSF, a project to further improve online chemistry education will result in new and improved materials delivered through OLI. New materials will be available from 2012 through 2014!

2 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Social Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

This course offers students an engaging introduction to the essential topics in psychology. Throughout this study of human behavior and the mind, you will gain insight into the history of the field of psychology, as well as explore current theories and issues in areas such as cognition, motivation, and wellness. The course has been updated to align with DSM-5. The importance of scientific methods and principles of research design is emphasized throughout this course and presented in a way that will enrich your study of individuals as thinking, feeling, and social beings. This course is part of our Community College (CC-OLI) series. Although courses in this series are particularly well-suited to the needs of introductory community college courses, the course materials have been used successfully by learners and educators at a broad array of institutions.

No votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

In this course, students learn to analyze and produce effective printed documents, such as technical reports, proposals, and software documentation. To guide their learning, students are introduced to the basics of visual communication design and typography through a series of audio-visual explanations that describe and illustrate key concepts and vocabulary, self-assessments that verify the understanding, and hands-on exercises with individualized feedback that provide opportunities to try out what they learned. Learning Objectives Concepts and vocabularyStudents will be able to use the basic concepts and vocabulary of visual communication design to describe the design of documents. AnalysisStudents will be able to recognize and articulate good and problematic aspects of documents. ProductionStudents will be able to use typographic variables appropriately to create effective documents Who should use this OLI course Students who are interested in improving their visual design skills for creating effective documents may find it helpful to use this OLI course. Instructors of a course that require students to create visual communication materials may find it helpful to integrate this OLI course into their existing courses as a supplemental learning tool. Estimated Time to Complete The entire course can be completed in about 2 to 3 hours.

1 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Mathematics Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

Logic is a remarkable discipline. It is deeply tied to mathematics and philosophy, as correctness of argumentation is particularly crucial for these abstract disciplines. Logic systematizes and analyzes steps in reasoning: correct steps guarantee the truth of their conclusion given the truth of their premise(s); incorrect steps allow the formulation of counterexamples, i.e., of situations in which the premises are true, but the conclusion is false. Recognizing (and having conceptual tools for recognizing) the correctness or incorrectness of steps is crucial in order to critically evaluate arguments, not just in philosophy and mathematics, but also in ordinary life. This skill is honed by working in two virtual labs. In the ProofLab you learn to construct complex arguments in a strategically guided way, whereas in the TruthLab the emphasis is on finding counterexamples systematically. Who Should Take This Course? This is an introductory course designed for students from a broad range of disciplines, from mathematics and computer science to drama and creative writing. The highly interactive presentation makes it possible for any student to master the material. Concise multimedia lectures introduce each chapter; they discuss, in detail, the central notions and techniques presented in the text, but also articulate and motivate the learning objectives for each chapter. Open & Free Version The Open & Free, Logic & Proofs course includes the first five chapters of Logic & Proofs, providing a basic introduction to sentential logic. A full version of Logic & Proofs, including both sentential and predicate logic, is also available without technical or instructor support to independent users, for a small fee. No credit is awarded for completing either the Open & Free, Logic & Proofs course or the full, unsupported Logic & Proofs course. Academic Version Academic use of Logic & Proofs provides a full course on modern symbolic logic, covering both sentential and predicate logic, with identity. Optional suites of exams are available for use in academic sections.

1 votes
OLI. Carnegie Mellon University Free Computer Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Open Learning Initiative

Programming is a way of organizing a task so that it is replicable by something elsea computer. If you have ever given someone directions, or written down a recipe, you have some experience with programming. Learning more about programming will help you develop the skills of thinking systematically about a task and breaking it down into manageable pieces, which can be applied in many disciplines. This class contextualizes the task of programming by focusing on media, such as images, audio, and interactive systems. By doing so, we hope to put programming in a relevant context. For example, iteration is a programming concept that is essential to creating negative and grayscale images. You will learn algorithms for blending two images together and how to hierarchical relationships are used to organize elements of a user interface. This introductory course has no particular prerequisites and is primarily designed for non-computer science students.