Online courses directory (5)

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Starts : 2010-09-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences History MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

No votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Crash Course Crash Course World History

John Green teaches you the history of the world in 42 episodes of Crash Course. The Agricultural Revolution. Indus Valley Civilization. Ancient Mesopotamia. Ancient Egypt. Greeks and Persians. Buddha and Ashoka. 2000 Years of Chinese History! The Mandate of Heaven and Confuscius. Alexander the Great and the Situation... the Great?. The Silk Road and Ancient Trade. The Roman Empire. Or Republic. Or... Which Was It?. Christianity from Judaism to Constantine. Fall of Rome the Roman Empire... in the 15th Century. Islam, the Quran, and the Five Pillars All Without a Flamewar. The Dark Ages...How Dark Were They, Really?. The Crusades - Pilgrimage or Holy War?. Mansa Musa and Islam in Africa. Wait for it... The Mongols!. International Commerce, Snorkeling Camels, and The Indian Ocean Trade. Venice and the Ottoman Empire. Russia, the Kievan Rus, and the Mongols. Columbus, de Gama, and Zheng He! 15th Century Mariners. The Renaissance: Was it a Thing?. The Columbian Exchange. The Atlantic Slave Trade. The Spanish Empire, Silver, & Runaway Inflation. The Seven Years War. The Amazing Life and Strange Death of Captain Cook. Tea, Taxes, and The American Revolution. The French Revolution. The Haitian Revolutions. Latin American Revolutions. Coal, Steam, and The Industrial Revolution. Capitalism and Socialism. Samurai, Daimyo, Matthew Perry, and Nationalism. Imperialism. Archdukes, Cynicism, and World War I. Communists, Nationalists, and China's Revolutions. World War II. USA vs USSR Fight! The Cold War. Decolonization and Nationalism Triumphant. Globalization I - The Upside. Globalization II - Good or Bad?. The Agricultural Revolution. Indus Valley Civilization. Ancient Mesopotamia. Ancient Egypt. Greeks and Persians. Buddha and Ashoka. 2000 Years of Chinese History! The Mandate of Heaven and Confuscius. Alexander the Great and the Situation... the Great?. The Silk Road and Ancient Trade. The Roman Empire. Or Republic. Or... Which Was It?. Christianity from Judaism to Constantine. Fall of Rome the Roman Empire... in the 15th Century. Islam, the Quran, and the Five Pillars All Without a Flamewar. The Dark Ages...How Dark Were They, Really?. The Crusades - Pilgrimage or Holy War?. Mansa Musa and Islam in Africa. Wait for it... The Mongols!. International Commerce, Snorkeling Camels, and The Indian Ocean Trade. Venice and the Ottoman Empire. Russia, the Kievan Rus, and the Mongols. Columbus, de Gama, and Zheng He! 15th Century Mariners. The Renaissance: Was it a Thing?. The Columbian Exchange. The Atlantic Slave Trade. The Spanish Empire, Silver, & Runaway Inflation. The Seven Years War. The Amazing Life and Strange Death of Captain Cook. Tea, Taxes, and The American Revolution. The French Revolution. The Haitian Revolutions. Latin American Revolutions. Coal, Steam, and The Industrial Revolution. Capitalism and Socialism. Samurai, Daimyo, Matthew Perry, and Nationalism. Imperialism. Archdukes, Cynicism, and World War I. Communists, Nationalists, and China's Revolutions. World War II. USA vs USSR Fight! The Cold War. Decolonization and Nationalism Triumphant. Globalization I - The Upside. Globalization II - Good or Bad?.

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences History

This course will introduce you to the history of the Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World from 1776 to 1848. You will learn about the revolutionary upheavals that took place in the Americas and Europe during this period. Each unit will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the secession of the American colonies from the British Empire, the outbreak of the French Revolution, the dissolution of the Spanish and Portuguese Empires in the Americas, and the spread of revolutionary ideals throughout the Atlantic World. Running alongside and extending beyond these political revolutions is the First Industrial Revolution. By the end of the course, you will understand how an Atlantic World, dominated by European empires in 1776, was transformed through revolution into a series of independent states by 1848 and of the profound changes that Europe would experience, and continue to experience, through the development and…

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences History

This course will introduce you to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. You will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. The course will be structured chronologically and geographically; each unit with focus on a particular aspect of the Atlantic slave trade. Each unit will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as slavery and the slave trade within African societies, the growth of plantation societies in the New World, the advent of European slave dealing in western Africa, the simultaneous growth of European empires and the Atlantic slave trade, the nature of slave trading and the Middle Passage, and the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century. By the end of the course, you will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mi…

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences History

This course will introduce you to a comparative history of New World societies from 1400 to 1750. You will learn about European exploration and colonization as well as the cultures of native peoples of the Americas. The course will be structured geographically; each unit will focus on a particular New World society during a specific time period. Each unit will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the fifteenth-century conceptualization of the “New World” and colonization, the indigenous peoples living in the Americas at the time of European contact, and the effect of New World societies on native peoples and Africans. By the end of the course, you will understand how the new communities in the New World evolved from fledgling settlements into profitable European colonies and how New World societieswhether French, Spanish, Portuguese, English, or indigenouswere highly varied polities.

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