Online courses directory (13)

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Starts : 2003-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course is an investigation of affective priming and creation of rigorously counterbalanced, fully computerized testing paradigm. Includes background readings, study design, counterbalancing, study execution, data analysis, presentation of poster, and final paper.

Starts : 2006-02-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Life Sciences Chemical Engineering Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This course provides an introduction to the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, including experience with computer codes. It is intended for undergraduates and first year graduate students.

Starts : 2006-02-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Life Sciences Chemical Engineering Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This course provides an introduction to the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, including experience with computer codes. It is intended for undergraduates and first year graduate students.

2 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

In this course, you will look at the properties behind the basic concepts of probability and statistics and focus on applications of statistical knowledge.  You will learn about how statistics and probability work together.  The subject of statistics involves the study of methods for collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data.  Statistics formalizes the process of making decisions, and this course is designed to help you use statistical literacy to make better decisions.  Note that this course has applications for the natural sciences, economics, computer science, finance, psychology, sociology, criminology, and many other fields. We read data in articles and reports every day.  After finishing this course, you should be comfortable evaluating an author's use of data.  You will be able to extract information from articles and display that information effectively.  You will also be able to understand the basics of how to draw statistical conclusions. This course will begin with descriptive statistic…

2 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

The advent of computers transformed science.  Large, complicated datasets that once took researchers years to manually analyze could suddenly be analyzed within a week using computer software.  Nowadays, scientists can use computers to produce several hypotheses as to how a particular phenomenon works, create computer models using the parameters of each hypothesis, input data, and see which hypothetical model produces an output that most closely mirrors reality. Computational biology refers to the use of computers to automate data analysis or model hypotheses in the field of biology.  With computational biology, researchers apply mathematics to biological phenomena, use computer programming and algorithms to artificially create or model the phenomena, and draw from statistics in order to interpret the findings.  In this course, you will learn the basic principles and procedures of computational biology.  You will also learn various ways in which you can apply computational biology to molecular and cell…

Starts : 2002-02-01
24 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Consists of a series of hands-on laboratories designed to give students experience with common techniques for conducting neuroscience research. Included are sessions on anatomical, ablation, neurophysiological, and computer modeling techniques, and ways these techniques are used to study brain function. Each session consists of a brief quiz on assigned readings that provide background to the lab, a lecture that expands on the readings, and that week's laboratory. Lab reports required. Students receive training in the art of scientific writing and oral presentation with feedback designed to improve writing and speaking skills. Assignments include two smaller lab reports, one major lab report with revision, and an oral report.

Starts : 2002-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Computer Sciences Graduate Health Sciences and Technology MIT OpenCourseWare

This course introduces abstraction as an important mechanism for problem decomposition and solution formulation in the biomedical domain, and examines computer representation, storage, retrieval, and manipulation of biomedical data. As part of the course, we will briefly examine the effect of programming paradigm choice on problem-solving approaches, and introduce data structures and algorithms. We will also examine knowledge representation schemes for capturing biomedical domain complexity and principles of data modeling for efficient storage and retrieval. The final project involves building a medical information system that encompasses the different concepts taught in the course.

Computer science basics covered in the first part of the course are integral to understanding topics covered in the latter part, and for completing the assigned homework.

Starts : 2001-02-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

The course focuses on the problem of supervised learning within the framework of Statistical Learning Theory. It starts with a review of classical statistical techniques, including Regularization Theory in RKHS for multivariate function approximation from sparse data. Next, VC theory is discussed in detail and used to justify classification and regression techniques such as Regularization Networks and Support Vector Machines. Selected topics such as boosting, feature selection and multiclass classification will complete the theory part of the course. During the course we will examine applications of several learning techniques in areas such as computer vision, computer graphics, database search and time-series analysis and prediction. We will briefly discuss implications of learning theories for how the brain may learn from experience, focusing on the neurobiology of object recognition. We plan to emphasize hands-on applications and exercises, paralleling the rapidly increasing practical uses of the techniques described in the subject.

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Introduction to Psychology Psychology Social Sciences

In this course, we will look at the properties behind the basic concepts of probability and statistics and focus on applications of statistical knowledge.  We will learn how statistics and probability work together.  The subject of statistics involves the study of methods for collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data.  Statistics formalizes the process of making decisionsand this course is designed to help you cultivate statistic literacy so that you can use this knowledge to make better decisions.  Note that this course has applications in sciences, economics, computer science, finance, psychology, sociology, criminology, and many other fields. Every day, we read articles and reports in print or online.  After finishing this course, you should be comfortable asking yourself whether the articles make sense.  You will be able to extract information from the articles and display that information effectively.  You will also be able to understand the basics of how to draw statistical conclusions.

5 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Introduction to Psychology Psychology Social Sciences

This course will introduce you to the major concepts of and debates surrounding industrial and organizational psychology. Industrial and organizational psychology is the application of psychological research and theory to human interaction (both with other humans and with human factors, or machines and computers) in the workplace. The phrase “industrial and organizational psychology” (sometimes referred to as “I/O”) may be somewhat misleading, as the field deals less with actual organizations and/or industries and more with the people in these areas. As mentioned above, “I/O” is an applied psychological science, which means that it takes research findings and theories that may have originally been used to explain a general phenomenon of human behavior and applies them to human behavior in a specific setting (here, the workplace). Consider, for example, the fact that many jobs require applicants to take a personality test. Psychologists originally developed this test to detect and diagnose abnorm…

Starts : 2006-02-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

What are the circuits, mechanisms and representations that permit the recognition of a visual scene from just one glance? In this one-day seminar on Scene Understanding, speakers from a variety of disciplines - neurophysiology, cognitive neuroscience, visual cognition, computational neuroscience and computer vision - will address a range of topics related to scene recognition, including natural image categorization, contextual effects on object recognition, and the role of attention in scene understanding and visual art. The goal is to encourage exchanges between researchers of all fields of brain sciences in the burgeoning field of scene understanding.

Starts : 2001-09-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

An advanced seminar on issues of current interest in human and machine vision. Topics vary from year to year. This year, the class will involve studying the perception of materials. Participants discuss current literature as well as their ongoing research. Topics are tackled from multiple standpoints, including optics, psychophysics, computer graphics and computer vision.

Starts : 2006-02-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is for upper-level graduate students who are planning careers in computational neuroscience. This course focuses on the problem of supervised learning from the perspective of modern statistical learning theory starting with the theory of multivariate function approximation from sparse data. It develops basic tools such as Regularization including Support Vector Machines for regression and classification. It derives generalization bounds using both stability and VC theory. It also discusses topics such as boosting and feature selection and examines applications in several areas: Computer Vision, Computer Graphics, Text Classification, and Bioinformatics. The final projects, hands-on applications, and exercises are designed to illustrate the rapidly increasing practical uses of the techniques described throughout the course.