Online courses directory (14)

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Starts : 2010-09-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science Undergraduate

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Starts : 2004-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course examines the causes and consequences of American foreign policy since 1898. Course readings cover both substantive and methods topics. Four substantive topics are covered:

  1. major theories of American foreign policy;
  2. major episodes in the history of American foreign policy and historical/interpretive controversies about them;
  3. the evaluation of major past American foreign policies--were their results good or bad? and
  4. current policy controversies, including means of evaluating proposed policies.

Three methods topics are covered:

  1. basic social scientific inference--what are theories? what are good theories? how should theories be framed and tested?
  2. historical investigative methodology, including archival research, and, most importantly,
  3. case study methodology.

Historical episodes covered in the course are used as raw material for case studies, asking "if these episodes were the subject of case studies, how should those studies be performed, and what could be learned from them?"

Starts : 2014-01-13
No votes
JANUX Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Janux Poltical Science

This course examines Supreme Court decisions concerning the development of the 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 14th Amendments to the United States Constitution. We will look specifically at establishment and free exercise; free speech, including obscene speech; 4th Amendment guarantees against unreasonable searches and seizures; the 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination; 8th Amendment prohibitions against cruel and usual punishment; as well as related cases that have recognized rights of historically marginalized groups in United States history, including African-Americans, women, and sexual minorities through these Amendments. Particular attention will be paid to how the Supreme Court has developed arguments which have expanded and contracted “rights” and “liberties.” We will also pay close attention to larger political contexts apart from court decisions that contribute to the overall development of “civil rights and civil liberties” in the United States.

Starts : 2014-01-13
No votes
JANUX Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Janux Poltical Science

This course examines Supreme Court decisions concerning the development of the 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 14th Amendments to the United States Constitution. We will look specifically at establishment and free exercise; free speech, including obscene speech; 4th Amendment guarantees against unreasonable searches and seizures; the 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination; 8th Amendment prohibitions against cruel and usual punishment; as well as related cases that have recognized rights of historically marginalized groups in United States history, including African-Americans, women, and sexual minorities through these Amendments. Particular attention will be paid to how the Supreme Court has developed arguments which have expanded and contracted “rights” and “liberties.” We will also pay close attention to larger political contexts apart from court decisions that contribute to the overall development of “civil rights and civil liberties” in the United States.

5 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

Political thought, or political philosophy, is the study of questions concerning power, justice, rights, law, and other issues pertaining to governance. Whereas political science assumes that these concepts are what they are, political thought asks how they have come about and to what effect. Just as Socrates’s simple question “How should we be governed?” led to his execution, the question “What makes a government legitimate?” leads to political turmoil when posed at critical times. Political thought asks what form government should take and why; what duties citizens owe to a legitimate government, if any; and when it may be legitimately overthrown, if ever. Generally speaking, political thought, political philosophy, and political theory are terms often used interchangeably to mean the study of philosophical texts related to politics. This course examines major texts in the history of political thought. Many of these texts pose difficult questions concerning the political community, social order,…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

In the field of public policy and administration, there have been several enduring questions.  In a larger context, what is the role of government?  There has always been conflict in our society regarding the proper role of government.  How should public organizations be structured to reflect the will of the public?  How do we ensure accountability?  What is the proper role of the public administrator/analyst in policy implementation?  How should programs be evaluated? This course will provide you with an overview of the field of public administration, particularly the distinctions that set management of public organizations apart from that of private-sector organizations.  You will begin with an examination of the history and perception of the role of government in the provision of services.  You will then examine the context in which public administrators deliver services to citizens.  Public administrators must also possess a basic knowledge of managing organizations and people in order to imple…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

Comprehending the role that feminism has played in identifying, critiquing, and, at times, altering the distribution of political and economic power is integral to understanding democratic citizenship and government.  In this course, we will examine the history of feminist thought, beginning in the late eighteenth century and continuing through the early twenty-first century.  An overarching goal of this course is to encourage you to develop and shape your own concepts and ideas about feminist political thought as a potent and multifaceted global force.  In working toward this goal, we begin the course by defining feminism and engaging with some of the cultural and political stereotypes of feminism and feminist thinking in contemporary politics and popular culture.  Next, we explore the history of feminist thinking.  We conclude by examining current topics in feminist politics. Throughout the course, we will examine and discuss questions important to feminist politics, such as citizenship, political pa…

6 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

What is the best way to respond to global nuclear proliferation? Under what circumstances should American soldiers be sent to war? How should U.S. policymakers navigate a global economy? Will a global energy crisis precipitate a third world war? How does history inform contemporary U.S. foreign policymakers, and what issues will challenge future leaders? Such questions can seem beyond the scope of an individual, but they are questions that foreign policy decision makers in the United States must confront. Further, the issues that such questions raise must also be considered by members of the government bureaucracy and any citizen that wishes to be an informed participant in American democracy. The prominent role of the United States and a global leader makes examining and understanding the actions that the U.S. takes toward the rest of the world and how these decisions are made important for both American and citizens of other nations alike. This course will provide history, theory, and perspectives on curren…

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

At various points in history, the Middle East has been at the center of world civilization.   In the last century, however, the Middle East has been subjected to the conquest, colonization, and control of outside powers: the Ottoman Empire, the great European powers, and the United States.  This dynamic has had profound implications for the political identity of both Middle Easterners and their conquerors.  It has also meant that much of the recent political history of the Middle East has been a struggle for independence and state-buildinga struggle that continues to this day with profound implications for the region and the world as a whole. This course has two primary purposes: (1) to build a critical understanding of the key issues and conflicts in the politics of the modern Middle East and (2) to apply the following concepts to these issues and conflicts: scholarly methodology, colonialism, independence and state-building, the political mobilization of new social classes, the spread of capitalist ec…

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

This course will introduce you to the international relations of the Asia-Pacific region.  In political science, the “Asia-Pacific” region is generally limited to those parts of Asia east of India, and for the purposes of this course, will include Northeast (China, Japan, Taiwan, and the two Koreas) and Southeast Asia (Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Indonesia, Singapore, and the Philippines).  Countries in South and Southwest Asia, such as the Gulf States, India, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, will not be covered, nor will the Commonwealth countries of Australia and New Zealand.  Globalization, economic ties, national security issues, and politico-military alliances with the U.S. make an understanding of this region important to any political science student or participant in American government. The political systems of Asia have a much longer history (dating back nearly 5,000 years) than do the systems you may be accustomed to studying in the West.  The general philosophical outlooks of the Asian…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

In this course, you will learn about the complexities of the legislative branch by examning the U.S. Congress in the American political system.  Course content will focus first on the history of Congress and the constant tension between Congress’ competing representation and lawmaking functions.  In this respect, you will focus on topics that include the history and original purpose of the legislative branch, the basic structure of Congress, and the electoral considerations and dynamics that impact how members of Congress act.  The course will then take a careful look at the internal politics and law-making processes of Congress.  Here, you will learn not only the “nuts and bolts” of the legislative process, but also the reasons why rules are designed as they are as well as the external competing interests that impact members and shape legislative outcomes.  By the end of the course, you should be able to explain how a bill becomes a law, how it evolved throughout the legislative process, and what…

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

Americans are known for their competitive nature.  Whether between two sports teams on a field or between candidates in the political arena running for office, competition is a fundamental part of the American culture.  For this reason, campaigns and elections are among the most exciting events in American politics.  In this course, you will explore campaigns and elections, learning their purpose and significance and observing the impact that they have on the American political system. Unit 1 will provide you with a basic understanding of the American electoral process by focusing on the history and evolution of elections and voting laws in the United States.  Unit 2 will look closely at what compels individuals to run for office and the many factors that must be considered when launching a campaign: strategy, organization, fundraising, themes, and messages.  In Unit 3, you will learn how political parties and interest groups play into the political drama of elections.  Units 4 and 5 will introduce yo…

Starts : 2014-11-03
32 votes
Coursera Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law English Humanities Social Sciences

This course gives an introduction into the field of terrorism & counterterrorism studies. It will help you to analyze and understand these complex phenomena and discuss its impact on society with a global audience.
Students, policy makers, journalists or anyone with a strong interest in understanding issues like the history, origins and nature of terrorism, security, fear management, resilience, politics, violence, foreign fighters and radicalization will find the course most relevant.

Starts : 2017-08-07
No votes
Open2Study Free Public Affairs & Law

Learn to understand criminal behaviour by looking at our evolutionary history and animal behaviour in general.

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