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No votes
Study.com Free Closed [?] Social Sciences AP EPA

Build your earth science vocabulary and learn about cycles of matter and types of sedimentary rocks through the Education Portal course Earth Science 101: Earth Science. Our series of video lessons and accompanying self-assessment quizzes can help you boost your scientific knowledge ahead of the Excelsior Earth Science exam . This course was designed by experienced educators and examines both science basics, like experimental design and systems of measurement, and more advanced topics, such as analysis of rock deformation and theories of continental drift.

333 votes
Khan Academy Free Popular Closed [?] Computer Sciences Advanced Cryptography Ancient Cryptography Applied Math Cryptography

Explore how we have hidden secret messages through history. What is Cryptography?. Probability Space. The Caesar Cipher. Polyalphabetic Cipher. The One-Time Pad. Frequency Stability. The Enigma Encryption Machine (case study). Perfect Secrecy. Pseudorandom Number Generators.

109 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Mathematics Applied Math Information Theory

The math behind human, animal and machine communication. What is Information Theory?. Prehistory: Proto-writing. Ptolemaic: Rosetta Stone. Ancient History: The Alphabet. Source Encoding. Visual Telegraphs (case study).

28 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Computer Sciences Advanced Cryptography Applied Math Cryptography Journey into Cryptography

How have humans protected their secret messages through history? What has changed today?. What is Cryptography?. Probability Space. The Caesar Cipher. Caesar Cipher Exploration. Frequency Fingerprint Exploration . Polyalphabetic Cipher. Polyalphabetic Exploration. The One-Time Pad. Perfect Secrecy Exploration. Frequency Stability. Coin flip sequences. Frequency Stability Exploration. The Enigma Encryption Machine (case study). Perfect Secrecy. Pseudorandom Number Generators. Random Walk Exploration. Ciphers vs. Codes. Shift Cipher. Caesar cipher encryption. Caesar Cipher Decryption. Caesar cipher frequency analysis. Vigenere cipher encryption. XOR Bitwise Operation. XOR & the One-Time Pad. XOR Exploration. Bitwise Operators. What's Next?. The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic. Public Key Cryptography: what is it?. The Discrete Logarithm Problem. Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange. RSA Encryption: step 1. RSA Encryption: step 2. RSA Encryption: step 3. Time Complexity (Exploration). Euler's Totient Function. Euler Totient Exploration. RSA Encryption: step 4. What should we learn next?. What is Modular Arithmetic?. Modulo Operator. Congruence Modulo. Congruence Relation. Equivalence Relations. The Quotient Remainder Theorem. Modular Addition & Subtraction. Modular Addition. Modular Multiplication. Modular Multiplication. Modular Exponentiation. Fast Modular Exponentiation. Fast Modular Exponentiation. Modular Inverses. Introduction. Primality Test Challenge. Trial Division. Level 1: Primality Test. Running Time. Level 2: measuring running time. Computer Memory (space). Binary Memory Exploration. Algorithmic Efficiency. Level 3: Challenge. Sieve of Eratosthenes. Level 4: Sieve of Eratosthenes. Primality Test with Sieve. Level 5: Trial division using sieve. The Prime Number Theorem. Prime density spiral. Prime Gaps. Time Space Tradeoff. Summary (what's next?). Randomized Algorithms (intro). Conditional Probability (Bayes Theorem) Visualized. Guess the coin. Random Primality Test (warm up). Level 9: Trial Divison vs Random Division. Fermat's Little Theorem. Fermat Primality Test. Level 10: Fermat Primality Test. What's Next?. What is Cryptography?. Probability Space. The Caesar Cipher. Caesar Cipher Exploration. Frequency Fingerprint Exploration . Polyalphabetic Cipher. Polyalphabetic Exploration. The One-Time Pad. Perfect Secrecy Exploration. Frequency Stability. Coin flip sequences. Frequency Stability Exploration. The Enigma Encryption Machine (case study). Perfect Secrecy. Pseudorandom Number Generators. Random Walk Exploration. Ciphers vs. Codes. Shift Cipher. Caesar cipher encryption. Caesar Cipher Decryption. Caesar cipher frequency analysis. Vigenere cipher encryption. XOR Bitwise Operation. XOR & the One-Time Pad. XOR Exploration. Bitwise Operators. What's Next?. The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic. Public Key Cryptography: what is it?. The Discrete Logarithm Problem. Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange. RSA Encryption: step 1. RSA Encryption: step 2. RSA Encryption: step 3. Time Complexity (Exploration). Euler's Totient Function. Euler Totient Exploration. RSA Encryption: step 4. What should we learn next?. What is Modular Arithmetic?. Modulo Operator. Congruence Modulo. Congruence Relation. Equivalence Relations. The Quotient Remainder Theorem. Modular Addition & Subtraction. Modular Addition. Modular Multiplication. Modular Multiplication. Modular Exponentiation. Fast Modular Exponentiation. Fast Modular Exponentiation. Modular Inverses. Introduction. Primality Test Challenge. Trial Division. Level 1: Primality Test. Running Time. Level 2: measuring running time. Computer Memory (space). Binary Memory Exploration. Algorithmic Efficiency. Level 3: Challenge. Sieve of Eratosthenes. Level 4: Sieve of Eratosthenes. Primality Test with Sieve. Level 5: Trial division using sieve. The Prime Number Theorem. Prime density spiral. Prime Gaps. Time Space Tradeoff. Summary (what's next?). Randomized Algorithms (intro). Conditional Probability (Bayes Theorem) Visualized. Guess the coin. Random Primality Test (warm up). Level 9: Trial Divison vs Random Division. Fermat's Little Theorem. Fermat Primality Test. Level 10: Fermat Primality Test. What's Next?.

40 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Computer Sciences Applied Math Information Theory Journey into Information Theory

We've always been communicating.... as we moved from signal fires, to alphabets & electricity the problems remained the same. What is Information Theory?. Prehistory: Proto-writing. Ptolemaic: Rosetta Stone. Ancient History: The Alphabet. Source Encoding. Visual Telegraphs (case study). Decision Tree Exploration. Electrostatic Telegraphs (case study). The Battery & Electromagnetism. Morse Code & The Information Age. Morse code Exploration. What's Next?. Symbol Rate. Symbol Rate Exploration. Introduction to Channel Capacity. Message Space Exploration. Measuring Information. Galton Board Exploration. Origin of Markov Chains. Markov Chain Exploration. A Mathematical Theory of Communication. Markov Text Exploration. What's Next?. What is Information Theory?. Prehistory: Proto-writing. Ptolemaic: Rosetta Stone. Ancient History: The Alphabet. Source Encoding. Visual Telegraphs (case study). Decision Tree Exploration. Electrostatic Telegraphs (case study). The Battery & Electromagnetism. Morse Code & The Information Age. Morse code Exploration. What's Next?. Symbol Rate. Symbol Rate Exploration. Introduction to Channel Capacity. Message Space Exploration. Measuring Information. Galton Board Exploration. Origin of Markov Chains. Markov Chain Exploration. A Mathematical Theory of Communication. Markov Text Exploration. What's Next?.

Starts : 2017-09-27
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English EdX Humanities Literature UC BerkeleyX

This course prepares you to read more deeply and write more clearly about works of literature. Through an engaging collection of videos, authentic readings, and support material from a variety of sources, you will learn to appreciate literature from different genres. You will learn about different genres of poetry and the history of some of our greatest poets.

You will broaden your vocabulary while you sharpen your academic and creative writing skills. Interaction with other students will help you to refine your thinking about the reading and writing as well. You will learn to write under time pressure, and have the opportunity to complete practice assignments that are similar to those you will find on the AP examination.

There are no prerequisites; you don’t have to take the AP exam to join the course. If you want to learn about poetry, literature and writing, this course is for you.

Starts : 2015-09-15
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English EdX Environmental Studies RiceX Science

Preparing for the AP Environmental Science exam requires a deep understanding of many different topics in environmental science as well as an understanding of the AP exam and the types of questions it asks. This course is Part 1 of our AP Environmental Science series designed to prepare you for the AP exam. 

In Part 1, you will learn about the living world. You will examine environmental issues, look at the history of environmental problems, discuss evolution and its link to biodiversity, climates and biomes, ecosystems and the life found there. 

As you work through this course, you will find lecture videos taught by expert AP Environmental Science teachers, practice multiple choice questions and free response questions that are similar to what you will encounter on the AP exam and tutorial videos that show you step-by-step how to solve problems.  By the end of the course, you will be prepared to take on the AP exam!

 

This course is authorized as an Advanced Placement® (AP®) course by the AP Course Audit. The AP Course Audit was created by the College Board to give schools and students the confidence that all AP courses meet or exceed the same clearly articulated curricular expectations of colleges and universities.

By taking an AP course and scoring successfully on the related AP Exam, students can:

  • Stand Out in College Admissions
  • Earn College Credits
  • Skip Introductory Classes
  • Build College Skills

Advanced Placement® and AP® are trademarks registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, these offerings.

 

Starts : 2016-09-13
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Biology & Life Sciences EdX Science Social Sciences UBCx

This psychology course is an introduction to the field of psychology. It begins by asking “What is Psychology?” and provides some concrete answers to that question. Next, it covers the history of psychology and provides a look at the state of psychology today.

This course will provide you with research-based study tips — to help you in this course and in the future. You will learn the methods a psychologist uses in their research. From experimental design to coverage of some basic statistics — by the end of this course you will have a comprehensive appreciation for the methods of psychology.

This course includes video-based lectures and demonstrations, interviews with real research psychologists and a plethora of practice questions to help prepare you for the AP® Psychology exam.

This is the first in our six-course AP® Psychology sequence designed to prepare you for the AP® Psychology exam.

Additional Courses: 

AP® Psychology - Course 2: How the Brain Works

AP® Psychology - Course 3: How the Mind Works

AP® Psychology - Course 4: How Behavior Works

AP® Psychology - Course 5: Health and Behavior 

AP® Psychology - Course 6: Exam Preparation & Review

Starts : 2017-01-03
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Biology & Life Sciences EdX Science Social Sciences UBCx

This psychology course is all about how behavior works. You will learn the theories of motivation, hunger, eating, the obesity epidemic, and sexual behavior. We will also examine theories of emotion and observe how developmental psychologists study phenomena across a lifespan.

We will explore cognitive development, the history of intelligence and testing, and the relationship between creativity and mental illness. The course concludes with in-depth coverage of the fields of personality psychology and social psychology.

This course includes video-based lectures and demonstrations, interviews with real research psychologists and a plethora of practice questions to help prepare you for that AP® Psychology exam.

This is the fourth in a six-course AP® Psychology sequence designed to prepare you for the AP® Psychology exam.

Additional Courses: 

AP® Psychology - Course 1: What is Psychology

AP® Psychology - Course 2: How the Brain Works

AP® Psychology - Course 3: How the Mind Works

AP® Psychology - Course 5: Health and Behavior 

AP® Psychology - Course 6: Exam Preparation & Review

Starts : 2015-03-02
No votes
Iversity Free Closed [?] English Architecture

Architecture 101

To learn more about architecture 101, we kindly invite you to read about it in the first part of the course description, here. Being this part 2 (from place to space), in order to understand the whole picture, it is better to start from part 1.

Architecture 101 (part 2: from place to space)

In part 1 of our course, we explore the state of nothingness and start moving towards the idea of “place”. In part 2, we deal with the concept of “place” and our conceptual journey goes on towards “space”.

In short:

part 1: from nothingness to place
part 2: from place to space
part 3: from space to architecture

Places to stay, to move, to eat, to cook, to love. Place to live. Place to die.
Places for our bodies, places on our bodies.

Places to clean and remember. We went all over the place... Different places for doing so many different things. Different places and different positions, all weaven to different states of mind.

Of course, in this 6-month journey called “Architecture 101”, we expect the final output to be about making architecture. And it will be (part 3).

But as we said before: we cannot make architecture without understanding what space is, and we cannot sense any kind of space before knowing about “place”, and we cannot imagine any kind of place without getting into a mental and physical state of pure nothingness.

So now, how do we go from to place to space?

As John Cage told us in the first week of part 1, "There is no such thing as an empty space or an empty time. There is always something to see, something to hear. In fact, try as we may to make a silence, we cannot."

“In a small room one does not say what one would in a large room.” (Louis Kahn)

What more could we add?

In this part of the course, we will understand what kind of matter surrounds us and how this matters to us. What matters? This is what we will need to find out.

Then, we will try to define the boundaries of this matter at hand. Adding a new dimension to the whole thing, we will put ourselves into context. A physical and a mental context. All of this, using a “hands-on” system (you will learn by doing).

Course Structure

Week 1: taking measurements
Week 2: proportions
Week 3: technical drawing
Week 4: papercut models
Week 5: the history of place / the history of space
Week 6: in a world of webzines
Week 7: what is an “exam”?
Week 8: what is a “break”?

Learning Objectives

We will see spaces like architects do.
We will explore the ways in which place becomes space.
We will learn to measure and project ideas into a 3 dimensional way.

We will also learn a significative amount of extremely interesting (and totally useless) things.

All of the above refers to the conceptual part of our course.
Then, since we love having our students making practical things, you will also learn lots of technical things using a number of interesting applications.

What will I make?

A scale model in a box (a box with a given proportion, size, appearance) in which you will represent a specific “space”. If one thousand people finish this part 3, we will have a fabulous collection of 1000 boxes. A cool exhibition is on its way. Makes sense, don’t you think?

Prior knowledge

This is the 2nd part of a tripartite course called Architecture 101.
To have followed the first part is highly recommended, however not required.

Then, in terms of other kinds of prior knowledge, nothing in particular is required.
However, in terms of technical equipment, this course will be easier to follow for those with access to a smartphone or tablet.

You don’t need a smartphone or tablet. But, as we wrote, we imagined a class with thousands of people lost in their phones, from all around the world. In commuters, we trust!

Workload

Between 3 and 7 hours a week.
From Monday to Friday, for a total of 6 weeks, you will receive an email with a 15 second-video to watch (to get you in the mood), and a pdf with some instructions for completing an assignment and a series of references (to go deeper in the subject at hand).

Then, you will get to work on your assignment. Once you complete your assignment, you will upload it to the iversity platform and share it on your preferred social media account(s). Ideally Instagram.

Then, during the weekend, we will give you some time to catch up.

Are you ready?

:-)

Starts : Jan 7, 2013/strong br
12 votes
Canvas.net Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Engaging with Art

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. The course includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative process and thought. This course will teach students to develop a five-step system for understanding visual art in all forms based on description, analysis, meaning, context, and judgement. The Open Course Library (OCL) is a project to create 81 openly-licensed high-enrollment general education college courses & lower textbook costs for students. The Art Appreciation course was developed by Christopher Gildow (Cascadia Community College), published originally with OCL, and is showcased here with his permission.

16 votes
Udemy $25 Closed [?] Social Sciences Art History Humanities

A clear concise history of art since Prehistory until the beginnings of the Italian Renaissance,

17 votes
Udemy $25 Closed [?] Social Sciences Art History Photography

A basic level survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

114 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Social Sciences - 400 C.E. Ancient Cultures Art History

Augustus of Primaporta. Painted Garden, Villa of Livia. Head of Augustus. Sculpture from the Parthenon's East Pediment. Victory Stele of Naram-Sin. Ancient Greek Temples at Paestum, Italy. Dying Gaul. Ara Pacis. The Standard of Ur. Dionysiac frieze, Villa of Mysteries, Pompeii. East and West Pediments, Temple of Aphaia, Aegina. Colosseum. Myron, Discobolus (Discus Thrower), Roman copy of an ancient Greek bronze from c. 450 B.C.E.. Nike of Samothrace. Law Code Stele of King Hammurabi . The Pergamon Altar. Arch of Titus. Great Lyre from the "King's Grave" at Ur. Hadrian's Villa: A Virtual Tour. Parthenon Frieze. Maritime Theatre at Hadrian's Villa, Tivoli. Neo-Assyrian Art: Human Headed Winged Lion and Bull (Lamassu). The Parthenon: Metopes. Pair of Centaurs Fighting Cats of Prey from Hadrian's Villa. Mixing Vessel with Odysseus Escaping from the Cyclops' Cave. Erechtheion: Caryatid and Column. Column of Trajan. Ishtar Gate and Processional Way . Medea Sarcophagus, 140 - 150 C.E.. Equestrian Sculpture of Marcus Aurelius. Ludovisi Battle Sarcophagus. After Praxiteles, Venus (Roman Copy). Apollonius, Boxer at Rest, c. 100 B.C.E.. Nude Woman (Venus of Willendorf). Seated Scribe. Arch of Constantine. Digging Through Time. Thutmose's Bust of Nefertiti. House Altar with Akhenaten, Nefertiti and Three Daughters. Ramesses II. Alexander Mosaic. The Colossus of Constantine. Rosetta Stone. Hellenistic Art at the Metropolitan: Eros Sleeping and An Old Market Woman. Bodhisattva from China. Geometric Greek Krater. Exekias, Attic black figure amphora with Ajax and Achilles playing a game. Buddha of Medicine Bhaishajyaguru (Yaoshi fo). Polykleitos, Doryphoros (Spear-Bearer). Barberini Faun, c. 220 B.C.E.. New York Kouros. Japan, Muromachi to Momoyama period Negoro ware ewer. Ancient Rome. Temple of Portunus. The Pantheon, Rome.

35 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Social Sciences - 400 C.E. Ancient Cultures Art History

Humans have been making art for tens of thousands of years, long before there was writing. Why was Egyptian art obsessed with death? Why did the ancient Greeks seek the perfect human form? How did the ancient Romans use art as state propaganda? Why was the naturalism of ancient Greek and Roman art abandoned with the rise of Christianity? This topic explores the art of the ancient world, from the Venus of Willendorf to a 6th-Century Chinese Bodhisattva. Prehistoric Art: Paleolithic Origins. Nude Woman (Venus of Willendorf). The Neolithic Revolution. Jade Cong. Prehistory: Proto-writing. Prehistoric Art Quiz. Introduction. Ancient History: The Alphabet. Sumerian Art: Standard of Ur. Sumerian Art: Great Lyre from the "King's Grave" at Ur. Akkadian Art: Victory Stele of Naram-Sin. Babylonian Art: Law Code Stele of King Hammurabi. Ashurbanipal Hunting Lions (Assyrian). Assyrian Art: Human Headed Winged Lion and Bull (Lamassu). Neo-Babylonian Art: Ishtar Gate and Processional Way. Ancient Near Eastern Art. Introduction. Egyptian Art. Materials & Techniques. Ancient Near Eastern & Ancient Egyptian Art. Old Kingdom: Seated Scribe. New Kingdom: House Altar with Akhenaten, Nefertiti and Three Daughters. Portrait Head of Queen Tiye with a Crown of Two Feathers. New Kingdom: Thutmose's Bust of Nefertiti. Judgement in the Presence of Osiris, Hunefer's Book of the Dead. New Kingdom: Ramesses II. Ptolemaic: Rosetta Stone. Ancient Egypt. Ancient Greece and Rome. Ancient Greek and Roman Art. Geometric: Terracotta Krater. Archaic: Exekias, Attic black figure amphora with Ajax and Achilles playing a game. Archaic: Exekias, Dionysos Kylix, c. 530 B.C.E.. Archaic: Mixing Vessel with Odysseus Escaping from the Cyclops's Cave. Archaic: New York Kouros. The Classical Orders. Archaic and Early Classical: Ancient Greek Temples at Paestum, Italy. Archaic and Early Classical: East and West Pediments, Temple of Aphaia, Aegina. Early Classical: Polykleitos, Doryphoros (Spear-Bearer). Classical: Myron, Discobolus (Discus Thrower), Roman copy of an ancient Greek bronze. Classical: Parthenon Frieze. Classical: Sculpture from the Parthenon's East Pediment. Classical: Parthenon Metopes. Classical: Caryatid and Column from the Erechtheion. Late Classical: Lysippos, Farnese Hercules, 4th century B.C.E. (later Roman copy by Glycon). Late Classical: Lysippos, Apoxyomenos (Scraper), c. 330 B.C.E. (Roman copy). Late Classical: After Praxiteles, Venus (Roman Copy). Hellenistic: Barberini Faun. Hellenistic: Dying Gaul. Hellenistic: Nike of Samothrace. Hellenistic: The Pergamon Altar. Hellenistic: Apollonius, Boxer at Rest. Hellenistic: Alexander Mosaic. Hellenistic: Laoco

115 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Social Sciences 1300-1400 Proto-Renaissance Art History

This is a transitional period. In the art of Florence and Siena there is a move away from medieval abstract depictions of space and the human body as artists began to focus on the illusion of mass and space and the expression of human emotion. With hindsight, it is possible to trace elements of Renaissance art back to this period. This century saw the creation of the beautiful poetry of Dante and Petrarch, but it is also the century that saw the worst outbreak of the Bubonic plague (known then as the Black Death) which wiped out close to half the population of Europe

106 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Social Sciences 1400-1500 Renaissance in Italy and the North Art History

This is the century that sees the full realization of the Renaissance and the end of the medieval way of thinking about the world. The Humanist rediscovery of ancient Greek and Roman culture is supported by the wealth accumulated in prosperous cities such as Bruges, Florence, and Venice. New wealth and increasing trade created a demand for an art based on the world we see. The second half of the century saw the invention of the printing press, and Columbus

126 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Social Sciences 1500-1600 End of the Renaissance and the Reformation Art History

If there was one century in the past that saw radical changes in established ways of thinking comparable to the 20th Century, it would be the 16th. Before this, in Western Europe, there was only one type of Christianity

116 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Social Sciences 1600-1700 The Baroque Art History

The 17th Century is the era of the Baroque style, characterized by energy, drama, and movement. The Church in Rome needed art that spoke to its resurgent power even as the conflict between Protestant and Catholics continued. A new realism

95 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Social Sciences 1700-1800 Age of Enlightenment Art History

From the frivolous paintings of Fragonard to the politically-charged moralizing images of David, this tutorial brings us from the King of France and his court

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