Online courses directory (771)

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4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

In this course, we will study the history of Eastern (Orthodox) Christian art.  The course begins with an overview of the emergence of Christianity in the Late Antique period and the formation of the Christian visual language that grew out of the Classical tradition.  The course then follows the development of Christian art after the fall of the Roman Empire and the emergence of a “new Rome” in the East: the Byzantine Empire.  A series of reading assignments paired with lectures and virtual tours will introduce you to important works of Early Christian and Byzantine art and will also give you an understanding of the central debates of Early Christian and Byzantine art historical scholarship. By the time you finish the course, you will be able to identify the most important artworks from this period and understand how their appearances relate to the social, political, and religious environment in which they were produced.  You will also be able to trace the ways in which Early Christian and Byzantine…

7 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History Contemporary Art

In common conversation, we often use the phrase “contemporary art” to refer to current artistic productionthe art being produced today.  However, in the art history field, the phrase denotes a specific period of art and artistic practice starting in the 1960s and continuing today.  It is characterized by a break from the modernist artistic canon and a desire to move away from the dominant Western cultural model, looking for inspiration in everyday and popular culture.  More specifically, many contemporary artworks reject traditional modernistic artistic media (such as painting or sculpture) in favor of a more collaborative, ephemeral, and multimedia approach that further blurs the boundaries between high and mass culture.  In its subject matter, this art also tends to reflect a shift away from purely aesthetic issues to more socially oriented concerns.  Finally, it is important to note that contemporary art should not be seen as a progression of different artistic styles but as series of different cu…

Starts : 2017-05-01
527 votes
edX Free Closed [?] Computer Sciences English ColumbiaX Computer Science EdX

What do self-driving cars, face recognition, web search, industrial robots, missile guidance, and tumor detection have in common?

They are all complex real world problems being solved with applications of intelligence (AI).

This course will provide a broad understanding of the basic techniques for building intelligent computer systems and an understanding of how AI is applied to problems.

You will learn about the history of AI, intelligent agents, state-space problem representations, uninformed and heuristic search, game playing, logical agents, and constraint satisfaction problems.

Hands on experience will be gained by building a basic search agent. Adversarial search will be explored through the creation of a game and an introduction to machine learning includes work on linear regression.

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Astronomy Electives

In ASTR101, you will be introduced to our current understanding of the universe and how we have come to this understanding.  We will start with the ancient Greeks and their belief that the universe was an orderly place capable of being understood.  We will continue through history, as we acquired more information on the nature of the universe and our models of the universe changed to reflect this.  This will take us through several different worldviews. As noted above, we will begin with the Greek worldview, which was characterized by the belief that the earth was the immovable center of the universe; this was known as the “geocentric” model.  Although this worldview is wrong in many of its details, it was a very important first step.  It explained the universe well enough that it lasted almost two thousand years.  By 1600, this belief was beginning to be challenged by such people as Copernicus, Kepler, and Galileo; finally, it was completely done away with by the physics of Newton.  By 1700, the…

No votes
Study.com Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences EPA Science

Get a sense of the universe's enormity and discover the infinitesimal portion of history occupied by human existence with this astronomy course. Instructors show you how scientists go about studying such a vast expanse of time and space by explaining topics like wave-particle duality and spectra sequence. They can also help you take on an in-depth examination of astronomical objects that include protostellar disks, black holes, neutron stars, the Jovian planets and more with lessons on the following topics:

Starts : 2016-05-31
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English ANUx EdX Physics Science

This course covers cosmology – the study of our entire universe. Where did the universe come from? How will it end? What is the nature of space and time?  For the first time in human history, we can give precise, reliable answers to many cosmological questions, thanks to a spectacular series of recent breakthroughs.  But many of the most fundamental mysteries remain unsolved. In this course we will cover the latest advances and the unsolved mysteries. We will explain the recent observations, and with the help of guest speakers Lawrence Krauss and Brian Cox, we will explore the theories behind modern cosmology.

This course is designed for people who would like to get a deeper understanding of astronomy than that offered by popular science articles and shows. You will need reasonable high-school level Maths and Physics to get the most out of this course.

This is one of four ANUx courses which together make up the Australian National University's first year astrophysics program. You can take these four courses in any order. These courses compromise the Astrophysics XSeries. Learn more about the XSeries program and register for all the courses in the series today!

Starts : 2013-09-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Comparative Media Studies/Writing MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States, the role of politeness in bourgeois Austrian culture, and the effect of Japanese manga on vividly graphic contemporary Asian cinema.

We will explore the politics and aesthetics of the extreme; affective questions about sensation, fear, disgust, and shock; and problems of torture, pain, and the unrepresentable. We will ask whether these texts help us understand violence, or whether they frame violence as something that resists comprehension; we will consider whether form mitigates or colludes with violence. Finally, we will continually press on the central term in the title of this course: what, specifically, is violence? (Can we only speak of plural "violences"?) Is violence the same as force? Do we know violence when we see it? Is it something knowable or does it resist or even destroy knowledge? Is violence a matter for a text's content—who does what, how, and to whom—or is it a problem of form: shock, boredom, repetition, indeterminacy, blankness? Can we speak of an aesthetic of violence? A politics or ethics of violence? Note the question that titles our last week: Is it the case that we are what we see? If so, what does our obsession with ultraviolence mean, and how does contemporary representation turn an accusing gaze back at us?

Starts : 2013-09-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Comparative Media Studies/Writing MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States, the role of politeness in bourgeois Austrian culture, and the effect of Japanese manga on vividly graphic contemporary Asian cinema.

We will explore the politics and aesthetics of the extreme; affective questions about sensation, fear, disgust, and shock; and problems of torture, pain, and the unrepresentable. We will ask whether these texts help us understand violence, or whether they frame violence as something that resists comprehension; we will consider whether form mitigates or colludes with violence. Finally, we will continually press on the central term in the title of this course: what, specifically, is violence? (Can we only speak of plural "violences"?) Is violence the same as force? Do we know violence when we see it? Is it something knowable or does it resist or even destroy knowledge? Is violence a matter for a text's content—who does what, how, and to whom—or is it a problem of form: shock, boredom, repetition, indeterminacy, blankness? Can we speak of an aesthetic of violence? A politics or ethics of violence? Note the question that titles our last week: Is it the case that we are what we see? If so, what does our obsession with ultraviolence mean, and how does contemporary representation turn an accusing gaze back at us?

Starts : 2005-09-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Materials Science and Engineering MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, pseudoscience, science, and technology of types of magnets, including applications in medicine. Several short written reports and at least one oral presentation will be required of each participant.

Starts : 2015-03-02
No votes
Coursera Free Ethnic Studies English Arts Humanities

This course is a short introduction to the rich and distinctive world of Australian literature, a world of ancient and modern forms of writing about a vast and varied continent. Explore the work of writers who have responded imaginatively to the unique landscapes of Australia and to its remarkable human history.

No votes
Canvas.net Free Closed [?] Business

Here is your chance to learn about digital badges and micro-credentialing, a great new way to engage students by recognizing their achievements at various stages in the learning process. This course will include a brief history of digital badges (or “badging”), an introduction to planning your badging system, and an introduction to creating and displaying badges. It will prepare you to make considerations for federal student information policies to develop internal procedures that support micro-credentialing programs. Participants may include educators and learning specialists who are already using badges; those who are aware of badges but have not been using them; anyone considering using badges; and anyone who knows nothing about digital badges and micro-credentialing but who wants to learn! Participants will have the opportunity to earn badges through class discussions and course assignments. “Learn-by-doing” is essential in this four-week course.

No votes
Udemy Free Closed [?] Technology

In this course you will know what is Hadoop and history behind evolution of Hadoop

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

This introductory course in biology starts at the microscopic level, with molecules and cells. Before we get into the specifics of cell structure and behavior, however, let’s take a cursory glance at the field of biology more generally. Though biology as we know it today is a relatively new field, we have been studying living things since the beginning of recorded history. The invention of the microscope was the turning point in the history of biology; it paved the way for scientists to discover bacteria and other tiny organisms and ultimately led to the modern cell theory of biology. You will notice that, unlike the core program courses you took in chemistry and physics, introductory biology does not have many mathematical “laws” and “rules” and does not require much math. Instead, you will learn a great number of new terms and concepts that will help you describe life at the smallest level. Over the course of this semester, you will recognize the ways in which the tiniest of molecules are involved…

9 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

Zoology is the scientific study of diversity of animal life, classification, physiology, behavior, and evolution. Unicellular organisms have evolved into complex multicellular forms. Organisms, both unicellular and multicellular, in various complex shapes and sizes are found in almost every habitat and environment. The field of zoology includes many subfields of biology as well as a vast diversity of unicellular and multicellular organisms. Animals first appeared in the fossil record an estimated 600 million years ago as multicellular protozoa. Over the next 70 million years, they radiated into an incredible number of different invertebrate phyla (which represent the majority of animal groups and species), and in the next 150 million years, vertebrate and invertebrate species began to colonize the land. Though the history of animals is extensive and the fossil record at times is conflicted and vague, understanding the historical connections between animals is important in order to understand modern-day rela…

6 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

One of the best ways to understand the present is to understand the past. Evolutionary Biology is the study of the changes in life forms over time - changes that have occurred over millions of years as well as those that have occurred over just a few decades. In this course, we will look at the various mechanisms of evolution, how these mechanisms work, and how change is measured. The concepts you learn in this course will serve as a foundation for studying fossil records and current classification schemes in biology. We will begin the course by reviewing the evolutionary concepts of selection and speciation. We will then learn to measure evolutionary change through comparisons with the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, to understand the process of change through Game Theory, and to interpret and classify changes by creating phylogenies. The course will wrap up with a look at the history of life according to the fossil record and a discussion of the broad range of life forms as they are currently classified. At the…

6 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

Cancer has existed among humans since humans themselves began and has been a subject of urgent interest from very early in our history.  What we call “cancer” consists of a number of different diseases with one fundamental similarity: they are all initiated by the unchecked proliferation and growth of cells in which the pathways and systems that normally control cell division and mortality are absent.  Cancer-cell abnormalities are often due to mutations of the genes that control the cell cycle and cell growth.  To understand cancer cells, then, one must first understand the processes that regulate normal cell cycles. This course will cover the origins of cancer and the genetic and cellular basis for cancer.  It will examine the factors that have been implicated in triggering cancers; the intercellular interactions involved in cancer proliferation; current treatments for cancer and how these are designed; and future research and treatment directions for cancer therapy.

Starts : 2009-02-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

96 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology Tree of life

Taxonomy and the Tree of Life. Species. Bacteria. Viruses. Human Prehistory 101: Prologue. Human Prehistory 101 Part 1: Out of (Eastern) Africa. Human Prehistory 101 Part 2: Weathering The Storm. Human Prehistory 101 Part 3: Agriculture Rocks Our World. Human Prehistory 101: Epilogue. Taxonomy and the Tree of Life. Species. Bacteria. Viruses. Human Prehistory 101: Prologue. Human Prehistory 101 Part 1: Out of (Eastern) Africa. Human Prehistory 101 Part 2: Weathering The Storm. Human Prehistory 101 Part 3: Agriculture Rocks Our World. Human Prehistory 101: Epilogue.

Starts : 2017-09-26
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Biology & Life Sciences DartmouthX EdX Science Social Sciences

Have you ever wondered why humans walk on two legs rather than four? In this course, we will explore how science investigates this unusual form of locomotion. We will start our investigation by looking at the mechanics of upright walking in humans and comparing that to bipedal locomotion in large birds, bears, and apes.

We will journey back millions of years into the human fossil record in an effort to understand how and why upright walking evolved. Around our first birthday, each of us learned how to walk, but how does this happen? With bipedalism came costly trade-offs as well-- we’ll examine these aches and pains as byproducts of our evolutionary history.

This course will take an intentionally interdisciplinary approach to studying how and why humans move bipedally. You will be exposed to anthropology, biomechanics, anatomy, evolution and paleontology to explore something deeply human: upright walking.

This course was developed in collaboration with SmithsonianX (National Musuem of Natural History and the National Zoological Park).

Starts : 2009-09-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences MIT Music and Theater Arts OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This class is an interdisciplinary survey that explores the experiences of people of African descent through the overlapping approaches of history, literature, anthropology, legal studies, media studies, performance, linguistics, and creative writing. It connects the experiences of African Americans and of other American minorities, focusing on social, political, and cultural histories, and on linguistic patterns. Activities include lectures, discussions, workshops, and required field trips that involve minimal cost to students.