Online courses directory (5)

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Starts : 2005-02-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Comparative Media Studies/Writing MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course has two parallel aims:

  1. To improve student writing about technical subject matters, including forms of writing commonly employed in technical organizations, and
  2. Critically to examine the nature of technologically-assisted communication, focusing somewhat on professional communication among scientists and engineers. We will often combine these two goals, by practicing critical investigation of communications technologies in written formats (and other media) that employ communications technologies.

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Starts : 2011-02-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Comparative Media Studies/Writing MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Students work in small collaborative design teams to propose, build, and document a semester-long project focused on mobile applications for cell phones. Additional assignments include creating several small mobile applications such as context-aware mobile media capture and games. Students document their work through a series of written and oral proposals, progress reports, and final reports. This course covers the basics of J2ME and explores mobile imaging and media creation, GPS location, user-centered design, usability testing, and prototyping. Java experience is recommended.

7 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Computer Sciences Computer Computer Science Programming language Software Engineering

This course will introduce you to the field of computer science and the fundamentals of computer programming. Introduction to Computer Science I is specifically designed for students with no prior programming experience, and taking this course does not require a background in Computer Science. This course will touch upon a variety of fundamental topics within the field of Computer Science and will use Java, a high-level, portable, and well-constructed computer programming language developed by Sun Microsystems (now Oracle), to demonstrate those principles. We will begin with an overview of the course topics as well as a brief history of software development. We will cover basic object-oriented programming terminology and concepts such as objects, classes, inheritance, and polymorphism, as well as the fundamentals of Java, its primitive data types, relational operators, control statements, exception handling, and file input /output. By the end of the course, you should have a strong understanding of the fundam…

Starts : 2002-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate Urban Studies and Planning

Modern industrial activities - which MIT engineers and scientists play a major role in - have significant environmental and social impacts. Trends towards further industrialization and globalization portend major challenges for society to manage the adverse impacts of our urban and industrial activities. How serious are current environmental and social problems? Why should we care about them? How are governments, corporations, activists, and ordinary citizens responding to these problems.

This course examines environmental and social impacts of industrial society and policy responses. We will explore current trends in industrialization, urbanization, and globalization, analyze the impacts these trends have on human health, environmental sustainability, and equity, and then examine a range of policy options available for responding to current problems. The course will present key trends in both domestic and international contexts.

We will examine four policy problems in particular during the course: (1) regulating industrial pollution; (2) regulating "sweatshops" and the broader impacts of globalization; (3) protecting ecosystems; and (4) protecting urban environments during development. We delve into specific cases of these challenges, including: chemical safety and toxins; computers, e-commerce, and the environment; biotech and society; sweatshops; and food production and consumption. Through these cases, we will explore underlying processes and drivers of environmental degradation. Finally, we will analyze opportunities and barriers to policy responses taken by governments, international institutions, corporations, non-governmental organizations, consumers, and impacted communities.

Objectives and Aims

  • An understanding of the complexity of environmental and social impacts of industry;
  • An ability to critically analyze policy responses;
  • An understanding of the roles of different actors and institutions in environmental and social controversies;
  • Means to evaluate institutional barriers to environmental and social policies;
  • New ideas for better integrating industry, environment, and equity;
  • New strategies for regulation in the global economy;
  • An understanding about personal responsibilities and roles in environmental and social problems.

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