Courses tagged with "Architecture" (121)

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Starts : 2017-09-12
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] Social Sciences English Architecture EdX History MITx

How do we understand architecture? One way of answering this question is by looking through the lens of history, beginning with First Societies and extending to the 16th century. This course in architectural history is not intended as a linear narrative, but rather aims to provide a more global view, by focusing on different architectural "moments."

How did the introduction of iron in the ninth century BCE impact regional politics and the development of architecture? How did new religious formations, such as Buddhism and Hinduism, produce new architectural understandings? What were the architectural consequences of the changing political landscape in northern Italy in the 14th century? How did rock-cut architecture move across space and time from West Asia to India to Africa? How did the emergence of corn impact the rise of religious and temple construction in Mexico?

Each lecture analyzes a particular architectural transformation arising from a dynamic cultural situation. Material covered in lectures will be supplemented by readings from the textbook A Global History of Architecture.

Join us on a journey around the globe and learn how architecture has developed and interacted with the world’s culture, religion, and history.

Starts : 2008-02-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This course will study the question of Global Architecture from the point of view of producing a set of lectures on that subject. The course will be run in the form of a writing seminar, except that students will be asked to prepare for the final class an hour-long lecture for an undergraduate survey course. During the semester, students will study the debates about where to locate "the global" and do some comparative analysis of various textbooks. The topic of the final lecture will be worked on during the semester. For that lecture, students will be asked to identify the themes of the survey course, and hand in the bibliography and reading list for their lecture.

Starts : 2004-02-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This advanced video class serves goes into greater depth on the topics covered in 4.351 , Introduction to Video. It also will explore the nature and function of narrative in cinema and video through exercises and screenings culminating in a final project. Starting with a brief introduction to the basic principles of classical narrative cinema, we will proceed to explore strategies designed to test the elements of narrative: story trajectory, character development, verisimilitude, time-space continuity, viewer identification, suspension of disbelief, and closure.

Starts : 2016-09-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This class is developed around the concept of disobedient interference within the existing models of production of space and knowledge.

Modeling is the main modus operandi of the class as students will be required to make critical diagrammatic cuts through processes of production in different thematic registers – from chemistry, law and economy to art, architecture and urbanism – in order to investigate the sense of social responsibility and control over the complex agendas embedded in models that supports production of everyday objects and surroundings. Students will be encouraged to explore relations between material or immaterial aspects and agencies of production, whether they emerged as a consequence of connection of mind, body and space, or the infrastructural, geographical and ecological complexities of the Anthropocene. These production environments will be taken as modeling settings.

Starts : 2009-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

The goal of this course is to investigate with students backgrounds on some of the pivotal events that have shaped our understanding and approach to architecture. Emphasis of discussion will be primarily on buildings and works of individual architects. Canonical architects, buildings and movements that have exerted significant influences on the development of architecture will be studied in detail. We will visit some of these buildings for a first-hand look and to evaluate for ourselves their significance or lack thereof. As a final project, each student will analyze a building through drawings, text, bibliography and a physical model in a format ready for documentation and exhibition.

Starts : 2004-09-01
5 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

An analysis of historical structures is presented themed sections based around construction materials. Structures from all periods of history are analyzed. The goal of the class is to provide an understanding of the preservation of historic structures for all students.

1 votes
Open.Michigan Initiative, University of Michigan Free Engineering Architecture Beams Concrete Materials Open Educational Resource Structural engineering

This course covers the basic principles of elastic behavior for different materials such as wood, steel, concrete, and composite materials and compares the properties and applications of materials generally. It investigates cross sectional stress and strain behavior in flexure and in shear, and torsion as well as the stability of beams and columns. The qualitative behavior of combined stresses and fracture in materials is also covered. Course Level: Undergraduate This Work, ARCH 324 - Structures 2, by Peter von Buelow is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

Starts : 2005-09-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This class investigates the use of computers in architectural design and construction. It begins with a pre-prepared design computer model, which is used for testing and process investigation in construction. It then explores the process of construction from all sides of the practice: detail design, structural design, and both legal and computational issues.

Starts : 2004-02-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This class investigates the theory, method, and form of collage. It studies not only the historical precedents for collage and their physical attributes, but the psychology and process that plays a part in the making of them. The class was broken into three parts, changing scales and methods each time, to introduce and study the rigor by which decisions were made in relation to the collage. The class was less about the making of art than the study of the processes by which art is made.

Starts : 2003-09-01
8 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This studio explores the notion of in-between by engaging several relationships; the relationship between intervention and perception, between representation and notation and between the fixed and the temporal. In the Exactitude in Science, Jorge Luis Borges tells the perverse tale of the one to one scale map, where the desire for precision and power leads to the escalating production of larger and more accurate maps of the territory. For Jean Baudrillard, "The territory no longer precedes the map nor survives it. …it is the map that precedes the territory... and thus, it would be the territory whose shreds are slowly rotting across the map." The map or the territory, left to ruin-shredding across the 'other', beautifully captures the tension between reality and representation. Mediating between collective desire and territorial surface, maps filter, create, frame, scale, orient, and project. A map has agency. It is not merely representational but operational, the experience and discursive potential of this process lies in the reciprocity between the representation and the real. It is in-between these specific sets of relationships that this studio positions itself.

Starts : 2003-09-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This semester students are asked to transform the Hereshoff Museum in Bristol, Rhode Island, through processes of erasure and addition. Hereshoff Manufacturing was recognized as one of the premier builders of America's Cup racing boats between 1890's and 1930's. The studio, however, is about more than the program. It is about land, water, and wind and the search for expressing materially and tectonically the relationships between these principle conditions. That is, where the land is primarily about stasis (docking, anchoring and referencing our locus), water's fluidity holds the latent promise of movement and freedom. Movement is activated by wind, allowing for negotiating the relationship between water and land.

Starts : 2003-09-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

The theme that unites the Level II studios in the fall semester is a focus upon the 'making of architecture and built form' as a tectonic, technical and materially driven endeavor. It is a design investigation that is rooted in a larger culture of materiality and the associated phenomena, but a study of the language and production of built form as an integrated response to the conceptual proposition of the project. The studio will look to works of architecture where the material tectonic and its resultant technology or fabrication become instrumental to the realization of the ideas, in whatever form they may take. This becomes the 'art of technology' -- suggesting a level of innovation and creative manipulation as part of the design process to transform material into a composition of beauty and poetry as well as environmental control. In this regard the studio will look to the works and design processes of a number of architects including Shigeru Ban, Peter Zumthor, Herzog and deMeuron, Kazuyo Sejima, Richard Horden, Rick Joy and Glenn Murcutt among others.

Starts : 2006-02-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

The project for this studio is to design a demonstration project for a site near the French Quarter in New Orleans. The objectives of the project are the following:

  1. To design more intense housing, community, educational and commercial facilities in four to six story buildings.
  2. To explore the "space between" buildings as a way of designing and shaping objects.
  3. To design at three scales - dwelling, cluster and overall.
  4. To design dwellings where the owners may be able to help build and gain a skill for employment.
  5. To provide/design facilities that can help the residents to gain education and skills.

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Starts : 2004-09-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This studio will investigate the social, programmatic, tectonic and phenomenological performance and character of a student gathering place on the MIT campus. Whether it is simply for socializing or for more specific events, the student gathering place will serve as a refuge from the vigorous educational environment of the Institute, and it will reinforce a critical sense of "place" through the almost logical organization of its program. The place will foster a casual discovery of "being": a reflection upon the student's own existence based upon participation in group events and an intellectual attitude toward acting. To create a space that inspires, rather than imposes: such a discovery is the foremost challenge of this studio.

Starts : 2015-01-05
No votes
Iversity Free Closed [?] English Architecture

Architecture 101:

Architecture to convert a place into a state of mind.
Apparently a simple task, actually a fairly tricky operation.
To (try to) understand, we split our journey into three parts.
This course is about part 1: from nothingness to place (part 2 is from place to space, part 3 is from space to architecture).

What is a place?
What is space?
How do we make space?
How do we prepare our mind to make space?

Without a concept, we can’t have a place.
Without a place, we can’t have space.
Without a space, we can’t have architecture...

If we want to create space, in the first instance, it has to happen in our mind. When a conceptual vision takes form in our minds, a place (with its own spatial features) is born.

Architecture 101 is an introduction to space and architecture through 101 exercises. A six-month journey divided into 3 courses “online” on iversity (part 1, part 2 and part 3), one final exhibition / graduation party. If you are still alive after all of this daunting process, there will be a one-week workshop “offline”, where we will go one step beyond.

In short:

Part 1: From Nothingness to Place (Jan 5 to Feb 28, we will work in 2d)
Part 2: From Place to Space (Mar 2 to Apr 25, we will work in 3d)
Part 3: From Space to Architecture (Apr 27 to Jun 20, we will work in scale 1 to 1)

Exhibition / Graduation at Abadir, in Sicily (Jun 19 to Jun 21, we set up our fancy exhibition)
Workshop: Architecture 101 Summer Camp at Abadir, in Sicily (Jun 22 to Jun 26, we build for real).

Architecture 101 (part 1: from nothingness to place)

To start our journey, we will deal with the absence of space and place.
Something that could be defined as “nothingness”.

As Ang Lee or Paul Valery would respectively say :
“The source of all the material comes from nothingness.”
“God made everything out of nothing, but the nothingness shows through.”

In a different way, Ludwig Wittgenstein taught us that when things have no name, they don’t exist. Hence in order to understand things, we have to start with worlds in which things have no name. Pieces of music without sound. Televisions without signal.

We will go through the process of shaping meaning. Articulate and complex meanings, defining relationships between mind and bodies, bodies and places. Little by little, we will encounter places and see the world taking shape.

All of this, using a “hands-on” system (you will by doing).

Course Structure

Week 1: taking pictures
Week 2: learning to sketch
Week 3: making collages
Week 4: observing the weather
Week 5: shaping diagrams
Week 6: drawing maps
Week 7: passing an exam
Week 8: taking a break

Learning Objectives

To see places like architects do.
To understand the principles upon which we convert a place into a state of mind.
We will explore nothingness, void and negative space.
We will learn to name things, we will learn how to invent place (as we wrote before, when things have no name, they cannot exist).

We will learn to stare, observe and see.
We will learn a significative amount of extremely interesting (and totally useless) things.

All of the above refers to the conceptual part of our course.
Then, since we love having our students making practical things, you will also learn lots of technical things using a number of interesting applications.

At the end, what do I make?

A booklet (with a given proportion, size, appearance) where you will collect all of your visual experiments. Each booklet devoted to a specific “place”. If one thousand people finish this part 1, we will have a fabulous collection of 1000 booklets.

Prior Knowledge

Important thing!

In terms of prior knowledge, nothing in particular is required.
However, in terms of technical equipment, this course will be easier to follow for those with access to a smartphone or tablet.
We shaped this course for a very specific kind of student.
Our imaginary student is a gent (or gentle lady) who accesses our content via his/her smartphone. Of course you can follow us via a desktop, make homework at home on your table. Yet, the way we intended the whole thing is for someone who takes the whole course (including doing homework) via a smartphone (or tablet).

Workload

Between 3 and 7 hours a week.
From Monday to Friday, for a total of 6 weeks, you will receive an email with a 15 second-video to watch (to get you in the mood), and a pdf with some instructions for completing an assignment and a series of references (to go deeper in the subject at hand).

Then, you will get to work on your assignment. Once you complete your assignment, you will upload it to the iversity platform and share it on your preferred social media account(s). Ideally Instagram.

Then, during the weekend, we will give you some time to catch up.

Are you ready?

:-)

Starts : 2015-03-02
No votes
Iversity Free Closed [?] English Architecture

Architecture 101

To learn more about architecture 101, we kindly invite you to read about it in the first part of the course description, here. Being this part 2 (from place to space), in order to understand the whole picture, it is better to start from part 1.

Architecture 101 (part 2: from place to space)

In part 1 of our course, we explore the state of nothingness and start moving towards the idea of “place”. In part 2, we deal with the concept of “place” and our conceptual journey goes on towards “space”.

In short:

part 1: from nothingness to place
part 2: from place to space
part 3: from space to architecture

Places to stay, to move, to eat, to cook, to love. Place to live. Place to die.
Places for our bodies, places on our bodies.

Places to clean and remember. We went all over the place... Different places for doing so many different things. Different places and different positions, all weaven to different states of mind.

Of course, in this 6-month journey called “Architecture 101”, we expect the final output to be about making architecture. And it will be (part 3).

But as we said before: we cannot make architecture without understanding what space is, and we cannot sense any kind of space before knowing about “place”, and we cannot imagine any kind of place without getting into a mental and physical state of pure nothingness.

So now, how do we go from to place to space?

As John Cage told us in the first week of part 1, "There is no such thing as an empty space or an empty time. There is always something to see, something to hear. In fact, try as we may to make a silence, we cannot."

“In a small room one does not say what one would in a large room.” (Louis Kahn)

What more could we add?

In this part of the course, we will understand what kind of matter surrounds us and how this matters to us. What matters? This is what we will need to find out.

Then, we will try to define the boundaries of this matter at hand. Adding a new dimension to the whole thing, we will put ourselves into context. A physical and a mental context. All of this, using a “hands-on” system (you will learn by doing).

Course Structure

Week 1: taking measurements
Week 2: proportions
Week 3: technical drawing
Week 4: papercut models
Week 5: the history of place / the history of space
Week 6: in a world of webzines
Week 7: what is an “exam”?
Week 8: what is a “break”?

Learning Objectives

We will see spaces like architects do.
We will explore the ways in which place becomes space.
We will learn to measure and project ideas into a 3 dimensional way.

We will also learn a significative amount of extremely interesting (and totally useless) things.

All of the above refers to the conceptual part of our course.
Then, since we love having our students making practical things, you will also learn lots of technical things using a number of interesting applications.

What will I make?

A scale model in a box (a box with a given proportion, size, appearance) in which you will represent a specific “space”. If one thousand people finish this part 3, we will have a fabulous collection of 1000 boxes. A cool exhibition is on its way. Makes sense, don’t you think?

Prior knowledge

This is the 2nd part of a tripartite course called Architecture 101.
To have followed the first part is highly recommended, however not required.

Then, in terms of other kinds of prior knowledge, nothing in particular is required.
However, in terms of technical equipment, this course will be easier to follow for those with access to a smartphone or tablet.

You don’t need a smartphone or tablet. But, as we wrote, we imagined a class with thousands of people lost in their phones, from all around the world. In commuters, we trust!

Workload

Between 3 and 7 hours a week.
From Monday to Friday, for a total of 6 weeks, you will receive an email with a 15 second-video to watch (to get you in the mood), and a pdf with some instructions for completing an assignment and a series of references (to go deeper in the subject at hand).

Then, you will get to work on your assignment. Once you complete your assignment, you will upload it to the iversity platform and share it on your preferred social media account(s). Ideally Instagram.

Then, during the weekend, we will give you some time to catch up.

Are you ready?

:-)

Starts : 2015-04-27
No votes
Iversity Free Closed [?] English Architecture

Architecture 101

To learn more about architecture 101, we kindly invite you to read about it in the first part of the course description, here. Eventually, also read the description of part 2 here.

Architecture 101 (part 3: from space to architecture)

In part 1 of our course, we explore the state of nothingness and start to understand the idea of “place”. In part 2 we learn to transform a place into a space. Now, we are ready for part 3: to transform a space into architecture.

What does it mean to transform a space into architecture?

“Architecture is the thoughtful making of space.” Louis Kahn

In part 2, we learn that space is composed of mind and matter. Now, in order for us to benefit from this matter, we need to put it in order. And this is exactly what architecture is all about. Architecture is about giving a very specific kind of meaning and symbolic value to a series of different things.

In this part of the course, we will plan, design and construct a system in which to organize and render coherent important matter (that matters to us). A matter of structure and proportions.

By doing so, we will give a new sense to place and space.

Are you ready?

Our 6-month online journey will be celebrated at Abadir in Sicily, where we will set up our final exhibition.

Course Structure

Week 1: materials
Week 2: colors
Week 3: sounds
Week 4: moving images
Week 5: animations
Week 6: the video
Week 7: about the exam
Week 8: break / exhibition / graduation party at Abadir, in Sicily

Week extra: Architecture 101 Summer Camp at Abadir, in Sicily (where we will build for real). If you are still alive by then, this “physical” 5-day workshop is a course in itself and it will soon be officially announced.

What will I learn?

To see architecture like architects do.
To explore the ways in which space becomes architecture.
To learn that form follows fiction.

We will also learn a significative amount of extremely interesting (and totally useless) things.

All of the above refers to the conceptual part of our course.
Then, since we love having our students making practical things, you will also learn lots of technical things using a number of interesting applications.

At the end, what do I make?

A video (with a given set of constraints) in which you will show your built 1 to 1 architecture. If one thousand people finish this part 3, we will have a fabulous collection of 1000 videos representing 1000 architectural concepts.

Prior knowledge

This is the 3rd part of a tripartite course called Architecture 101.
To have followed the first 2 parts (1 + 2) is highly recommended, however not required.

Then, in terms of other kinds of prior knowledge, nothing in particular is required.
However, in terms of technical equipment, this course will be easier to follow for those with access to a smartphone or tablet.

You don’t need a smartphone or tablet. But, as we wrote, we imagined a class with thousands of people lost in their phones, from all around the world. In commuters, we trust!

Workload

Between 3 and 7 hours a week.
From Monday to Friday, for a total of 6 weeks, you will receive an email with a 15 second-video to watch (to get you in the mood), and a pdf with some instructions for completing an assignment and a series of references (to go deeper in the subject at hand).

Then, you will get to work on your assignment. Once you complete your assignment, you will upload it to the iversity platform and share it on your preferred social media account(s). Ideally Instagram.

Then, during the weekend, we will give you some time to catch up.

Are you ready?

:-)

Starts : 2012-09-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Engineering Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This is the second undergraduate architecture design studio, which introduces design logic and skills that enable design thinking, representation, and development. Through the lens of nano-scale machines, technologies, and phenomena, students are asked to explore techniques for describing form, space, and architecture. Exercises encourage various connotations of the "machine" and challenge students to translate conceptual strategies into more integrated design propositions through both digital and analog means.

Starts : 2004-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This architectural studio will have one main project for the semester: to explore the issues surrounding the redesign of an area in Havana, Cuba. It is a typical area about the size of a Law of Indies block that presently has a mix of housing, work, and shopping, in buildings that need to be replaced and others that need to be rehabilitated. There is also vacant land, and buildings that are unused. Part of the blocks front on the Malecon, the street next to the water. The other edge fronts onto a typical neighborhood. The intention is to study the culture through an understanding of one area of Havana and then design an "echo" in architectural form. The design will include public space as well as a mix of buildings: some new, some rehabilitated.

Starts : 2004-02-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Architecture Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This architectural studio will have one main project for the semester: to explore the issues surrounding the redesign of an area in Havana, Cuba. It is a typical area about the size of a Law of Indies block that presently has a mix of housing, work, and shopping, in buildings that need to be replaced and others that need to be rehabilitated. There is also vacant land, and buildings that are unused. Part of the blocks front on the Malecon, the street next to the water. The other edge fronts onto a typical neighborhood. The intention is to study the culture through an understanding of one area of Havana and then design an "echo" in architectural form. The design will include public space as well as a mix of buildings: some new, some rehabilitated.

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