Courses tagged with "Calculus I" (31)

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No votes
Coursera Free Closed [?] BabsonX Business Administration Calculus I Nutrition

Por que os corpos se movem? Entenda como ocorreu a evolução da ideia do movimento dos corpos e aprenda a prever e a analisar o movimento de um objeto de forma moderna e interessante.

15 votes
Udemy Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Calculus I Foreign Language Histology Italian Language and Literature Lancaster University Mechanisms of organic chemical reactions

Lecture Series on Classical Physics by Prof.V.Balakrishnan, Department of Physics, IIT Madras.

7 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Calculus I Foreign Language International development Italian Language and Literature Lancaster University Mechanisms of organic chemical reactions

There are many different ways that you can go about solving engineering problems.  One of the most important methods is energy analysis.  Energy is a physical property that allows work of any kind to be done; without it, there would be no motion, no heat, and no life.  You wouldn’t be able to get out of bed in the morning, but it wouldn’t matter, because there would be no sun.  Without energy, our world would not exist as it does. Thermodynamics is the study of energy and its transfers though work.  It is the link between heat and mechanical exertion.  Once you have a solid grasp on thermodynamic concepts, you should be able to understand why certain mechanisms (such as engines and boilers) work the way they do, determine how much work they can put out, and know how to optimize these power systems.   A thorough understanding of thermodynamics is crucial to any career that focuses on HVAC systems, car engines, or renewable energy technology. This course will focus on the fundamentals of thermod…

40 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Calculus I Class2Go Foreign Language Global Warming Italian Language and Literature Lancaster University

Watch fun, educational videos on all sorts of Physics questions. Bridge Design and Destruction! (part 1). Bridge Design (and Destruction!) Part 2. Shifts in Equilibrium. The Marangoni Effect: How to make a soap propelled boat!. The Invention of the Battery. The Forces on an Airplane. Bouncing Droplets: Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Surfaces. A Crash Course on Indoor Flying Robots.

No votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Education Calculus I Class2Go Global Warming

Watch fun, educational videos on all sorts of Physics questions. Thomas Young's Double Slit Experiment. Newton's Prism Experiment. Bridge Design and Destruction! (part 1). Bridge Design (and Destruction!) Part 2. Shifts in Equilibrium. The Marangoni Effect: How to make a soap propelled boat!. The Invention of the Battery. The Forces on an Airplane. Bouncing Droplets: Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Surfaces. A Crash Course on Indoor Flying Robots. Heat Transfer. Thomas Young's Double Slit Experiment. Newton's Prism Experiment. Bridge Design and Destruction! (part 1). Bridge Design (and Destruction!) Part 2. Shifts in Equilibrium. The Marangoni Effect: How to make a soap propelled boat!. The Invention of the Battery. The Forces on an Airplane. Bouncing Droplets: Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Surfaces. A Crash Course on Indoor Flying Robots. Heat Transfer.

16 votes
Udemy Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Beginner Calculus I Computer%2525252BScience.htm%2525253Fdatetype%2525253Dupcoming&.htm%25253Fcategoryid%25253D7.htm%3Fc Histology Navigation+SAP

This Stanford Continuing Studies course is the second of a six-quarter sequence of classes exploring the essential theor

No votes
Coursera Free Closed [?] BabsonX Business Administration Calculus I Nutrition

A vida que conhecemos só ocorre na Terra ? Pode existir vida em outros lugares do Universo? Para conhecer melhor a vida faz-se necessário conhecer outras vidas. Este curso explora questões abertas sobre a origem da vida em um contexto astronômico.

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Calculus I Foreign Language Italian Language and Literature Lancaster University Mechanisms of organic chemical reactions Navigation+SAP

Physics 101 is the first course in the Introduction to Physics sequence. In general, the quest of physics is to develop descriptions of the natural world that correspond closely to actual observations. Given this definition, the story behind everything in the universe, from rocks falling to stars shining, is one of physics. In principle, the events of the natural world represent no more than the interactions of the elementary particles that comprise the material universe. In practice, however, it turns out to be more complicated than that. As the system under study becomes more and more complex, it becomes less and less clear how the basic laws of physics account for the observations. Other branches of science, such as chemistry or biology, are needed.  In principle, biology is based on the laws of chemistry, and chemistry is based on the laws of physics, but our ability to understand something as complex as life in terms of the laws of physics is well beyond our present knowledge. Physics is, however, the…

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Accessible Websites Calculus I Design.htm%25252525253Fdatetype%25252525253Dupcoming&.htm%252525253Fcategoryid%252525253D10.htm%2525 Nutrition Taking derivatives Undergraduate.htm%2525252525253Fstart%2525252525253D1400&limit%2525252525253D20.htm%25252525253Fsort

The physics of the universe appears to be dominated by the effects of four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism, weak nuclear forces, and strong nuclear forces.  These forces control how matter, energy, space, and time interact to produce our physical world.  All other forces, such as the force you exert in standing up, are ultimately derived from these fundamental forces. We have direct daily experience with two of these forces: gravity and electromagnetism.  Consider, for example, the everyday sight of a person sitting on a chair.  The force holding the person on the chair is gravitational, and that gravitational force balances with material forces that “push up” to keep the individual in place.  These forces are the direct result of electromagnetic forces on the nanoscale.  On a larger stage, gravity holds the celestial bodies in their orbits, while we see the universe by the electromagnetic radiation (light, for example) with which it is filled.  The electromagnetic force also makes…

18 votes
Udemy Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Calculus I Foreign Language Histology Italian Language and Literature Lancaster University Mechanisms of organic chemical reactions

Projectile motion, mechanics and electricity and magnetism.

31 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Calculus I Class2Go Foreign Language Italian Language and Literature Lancaster University Mechanisms of organic chemical reactions

Watch fun, educational videos on all sorts of Physics questions. Thomas Young's Double Slit Experiment. Newton's Prism Experiment. Bridge Design and Destruction! (part 1). Bridge Design (and Destruction!) Part 2. Shifts in Equilibrium. The Marangoni Effect: How to make a soap propelled boat!. The Invention of the Battery. The Forces on an Airplane. Bouncing Droplets: Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Surfaces. A Crash Course on Indoor Flying Robots. Heat Transfer. Thomas Young's Double Slit Experiment. Newton's Prism Experiment. Bridge Design and Destruction! (part 1). Bridge Design (and Destruction!) Part 2. Shifts in Equilibrium. The Marangoni Effect: How to make a soap propelled boat!. The Invention of the Battery. The Forces on an Airplane. Bouncing Droplets: Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Surfaces. A Crash Course on Indoor Flying Robots. Heat Transfer.

3 votes
Open.Michigan Initiative, University of Michigan Free Physical Sciences Calculus I Foreign Language Italian Language and Literature Lancaster University Mechanisms of organic chemical reactions Navigation+SAP

Physics 140 offers introduction to mechanics, the physics of motion. Topics include: linear motion, vectors, projectiles, relative velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, torque, angular momentum, gravitation, planetary motion, fluid statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, waves and sound. Course Level: Undergraduate This Work, Physics 140 - General Physics 1, by Gus Evrard is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

20 votes
Udemy Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Calculus I Foreign Language Histology Home Italian Language and Literature Lancaster University

This course provides a thorough introduction to the principles and methods of physics for students who have good prepara

7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Calculus I Infor Information control Information Theory Nutrition

Physics I is a first-year, first-semester course that provides an introduction to Classical Mechanics. It covers the basic concepts of Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics, and kinetic gas theory.

Course Format


Click to get started.This course has been designed for independent study. It includes all of the materials you will need to understand the concepts covered in this subject. The materials in this course include:

  • A complete set of Lecture Videos by renowned MIT Physics Professor Walter Lewin
  • A complete set of detailed Course Notes, replacing the need for a traditional course textbook
  • A complete set of Class Slides, with overviews and illustrations of the concepts and applications of the subject
  • Homework Problems and interactive Concept Tests to gauge your understanding of and progress through the materials
  • Homework Help Videos in which Prof. Lewin takes viewers step-by-step through solving homework problems
  • Selected links to websites with related materials, including videos, simulations, and animations
  • An Online Study Group at OpenStudy where you can connect with other independent learners.

The content has been organized for linear progression through each of the Course Modules, starting with Introduction to Mechanics and concluding with Central Force Motion. It is a self-study course that you can work through at your own pace.

Content Development


Dr. Peter Dourmashkin

Prof. Walter Lewin

Prof. Thomas Greytak

Craig Watkins

8 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Calculus I Infor Information control Information Theory Nutrition

This freshman-level course is the second semester of introductory physics. The focus is on electricity and magnetism, including electric fields, magnetic fields, electromagnetic forces, conductors and dielectrics, electromagnetic waves, and the nature of light.

Course Format


Click to get started.This course has been designed for independent study. It includes all of the materials you will need to understand the concepts covered in this subject. The materials in this course include:

  • A complete set of Lecture Videos by renowned MIT Physics Professor Walter Lewin
  • A complete set of detailed Course Notes, replacing the need for a traditional course textbook
  • A complete set of Class Slides, with overviews and illustrations of the concepts and applications of the subject
  • Homework Problems and Concept Questions to gauge your understanding of and progress through the materials
  • Homework Help Videos in which Prof. Lewin takes viewers step-by-step through solving homework problems
  • Visualizations of electromagnetic phenomena which are normally invisible to the human eye
  • An online study group at OpenStudy where you can connect with other independent learners

The content has been organized for linear progression through each of the Course Modules, starting with Electric Fields and concluding with The Nature of Light. It is a self-study course that you can work through at your own pace.

About OCW Scholar


OCW Scholar courses are designed specifically for OCW's single largest audience: independent learners. These courses are substantially more complete than typical OCW courses, and include new custom-created content as well as materials repurposed from previously published courses. Learn more about OCW Scholar.

No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Calculus I Infor Information control Information Theory Nutrition

This is the third course in the core physics curriculum at MIT, following 8.01 Physics I: Classical Mechanics and 8.02 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism. Topics include mechanical vibrations and waves, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Students will learn about musical instruments, red sunsets, glories, coronae, rainbows, haloes, X-ray binaries, neutron stars, black holes and Big Bang cosmology.

Course Components

  • Lecture Videos by MIT Physics Professor Walter Lewin
  • Viewing Notes aligned with the lecture videos
  • Concept Questions to gauge your understanding
  • Problem Sets and Exams with Solutions
  • Problem Solving Help Videos by MIT Physics Professor Wit Busza
317 votes
Khan Academy Free Popular Closed [?] Mathematics Accessible Websites Calculus I Class2Go Design.htm%25252525253Fdatetype%25252525253Dupcoming&.htm%252525253Fcategoryid%252525253D10.htm%2525 Undergraduate.htm%2525252525253Fstart%2525252525253D1400&limit%2525252525253D20.htm%25252525253Fsort

Electrostatics (part 1): Introduction to Charge and Coulomb's Law. Electrostatics (part 2). Proof (Advanced): Field from infinite plate (part 1). Proof (Advanced): Field from infinite plate (part 2). Electric Potential Energy. Electric Potential Energy (part 2-- involves calculus). Voltage. Capacitance. Circuits (part 1). Circuits (part 2). Circuits (part 3). Circuits (part 4). Cross product 1. Cross Product 2. Cross Product and Torque. Introduction to Magnetism. Magnetism 2. Magnetism 3. Magnetism 4. Magnetism 5. Magnetism 6: Magnetic field due to current. Magnetism 7. Magnetism 8. Magnetism 9: Electric Motors. Magnetism 10: Electric Motors. Magnetism 11: Electric Motors. Magnetism 12: Induced Current in a Wire. The dot product. Dot vs. Cross Product. Calculating dot and cross products with unit vector notation. Electrostatics (part 1): Introduction to Charge and Coulomb's Law. Electrostatics (part 2). Proof (Advanced): Field from infinite plate (part 1). Proof (Advanced): Field from infinite plate (part 2). Electric Potential Energy. Electric Potential Energy (part 2-- involves calculus). Voltage. Capacitance. Circuits (part 1). Circuits (part 2). Circuits (part 3). Circuits (part 4). Cross product 1. Cross Product 2. Cross Product and Torque. Introduction to Magnetism. Magnetism 2. Magnetism 3. Magnetism 4. Magnetism 5. Magnetism 6: Magnetic field due to current. Magnetism 7. Magnetism 8. Magnetism 9: Electric Motors. Magnetism 10: Electric Motors. Magnetism 11: Electric Motors. Magnetism 12: Induced Current in a Wire. The dot product. Dot vs. Cross Product. Calculating dot and cross products with unit vector notation.

90 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Calculus I Class2Go Forensic science

Fluids (part 1). Fluids (part 2). Fluids (part 3). Fluids (part 4). Fluids (part 5). Fluids (part 6). Fluids (part 7). Fluids (part 8). Fluids (part 9). Fluids (part 10). Fluids (part 11). Fluids (part 12). Fluids (part 1). Fluids (part 2). Fluids (part 3). Fluids (part 4). Fluids (part 5). Fluids (part 6). Fluids (part 7). Fluids (part 8). Fluids (part 9). Fluids (part 10). Fluids (part 11). Fluids (part 12).

59 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Mathematics Calculus I Class2Go Forms of competition

This tutorial is the meat of much of classical physics. We think about what a force is and how Newton changed the world's (and possibly your) view of how reality works. Newton's First Law of Motion. Newton's First Law of Motion Concepts. Newton's First Law of Motion. Newton's First Law. Newton's Second Law of Motion. Newton's Third Law of Motion. Newton's Third Law of Motion. All of Newton's Laws of Motion. Normal Force and Contact Force. Normal Force in an Elevator. Balanced and Unbalanced Forces. Unbalanced Forces and Motion. Slow Sock on Lubricon VI. Normal Forces on Lubricon VI. Inclined Plane Force Components. Ice Accelerating Down an Incline. Force of Friction Keeping the Block Stationary. Correction to Force of Friction Keeping the Block Stationary. Force of Friction Keeping Velocity Constant. Intuition on Static and Kinetic Friction Comparisons. Static and Kinetic Friction Example. Introduction to Tension. Introduction to Tension (Part 2). Tension in an accelerating system and pie in the face. Newton's First Law of Motion. Newton's First Law of Motion Concepts. Newton's First Law of Motion. Newton's First Law. Newton's Second Law of Motion. Newton's Third Law of Motion. Newton's Third Law of Motion. All of Newton's Laws of Motion. Normal Force and Contact Force. Normal Force in an Elevator. Balanced and Unbalanced Forces. Unbalanced Forces and Motion. Slow Sock on Lubricon VI. Normal Forces on Lubricon VI. Inclined Plane Force Components. Ice Accelerating Down an Incline. Force of Friction Keeping the Block Stationary. Correction to Force of Friction Keeping the Block Stationary. Force of Friction Keeping Velocity Constant. Intuition on Static and Kinetic Friction Comparisons. Static and Kinetic Friction Example. Introduction to Tension. Introduction to Tension (Part 2). Tension in an accelerating system and pie in the face.

46 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Calculus I Class2Go Intermediate Programming

Classical gravity. How masses attract each other (according to Newton). Introduction to Gravity. Mass and Weight Clarification. Gravity for Astronauts in Orbit. Would a Brick or Feather Fall Faster. Acceleration Due to Gravity at the Space Station. Space Station Speed in Orbit. Introduction to Newton's Law of Gravitation. Gravitation (part 2). Introduction to Gravity. Mass and Weight Clarification. Gravity for Astronauts in Orbit. Would a Brick or Feather Fall Faster. Acceleration Due to Gravity at the Space Station. Space Station Speed in Orbit. Introduction to Newton's Law of Gravitation. Gravitation (part 2).

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