Courses tagged with "CornellX" (12)

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Starts : 2017-02-15
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edX Free Closed [?] English CornellX EdX Engineering

In this hands-on course, you’ll learn how to perform engineering simulations using a powerful tool from ANSYS, Inc. This is a problem-based course where you’ll learn by doing. The focus will be on understanding what’s under the blackbox so as to move beyond garbage-in, garbage-out. You’ll practice using a common solution approach to problems involving different physics: structural mechanics, fluid dynamics and heat transfer.

We’ll solve textbook examples to understand the fundamental principles of finite-element analysis and computational fluid dynamics. Then we’ll apply these principles to simulate real-world examples in the tool including a bolted rocket assembly and a wind turbine rotor.We’ll discuss current industry practices with a SpaceX engineer. By working through examples in a leading simulation tool that professionals use, you’ll learn to move beyond button pushing and start thinking like an expert.

This course teaches fundamental concepts and tool use in an integrated fashion using the power of online learning. All learners will have access to a free download of ANSYS Student.

Join us to discover why simulations have changed how engineering is done and how you can be a part of this revolution.

Starts : 2015-03-23
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edX Free Closed [?] Social Sciences English Business & Management CornellX EdX History Humanities

Perhaps no story is as essential to get right as the history of capitalism. Nearly all of our theories about promoting progress come from how we interpret the economic changes of the last 500 years. This past decade’s crises continue to remind us just how much capitalism changes, even as its basic features—wage labor, financial markets, private property, entrepreneurs—endure. While capitalism has a global history, the United States plays a special role in that story. This course will help you to understand how the United States became the world’s leading economic power, revealing essential lessons about what has been and what will be possible in capitalism’s on-going revolution.


FAQ

Do I need to have taken economics before?
No. Though there will be discussion of economic ideas, professors will assume no prior economic training.

I am not familiar with American history, but I am interested in how capitalism works. Can I take this course?
Yes. We will have relevant links to helpful background material for each section that should make it possible for those with no knowledge of U.S. history to take the class.

Is this class about economic thought like Smith, Marx, Ricardo, Hayek, etc.?
This class is primarily about what actually happened rather than theories of what happened. While we will touch on important economic thinkers, this class will focus more on the people and institutions that developed capitalism in the United States. If you want to know how capitalism works and came about, this is the class for you.

Will certificates be awarded?
Yes. If you complete the work and achieve a passing grade in the course, you can earn a Honor Code Certificate, which indicates that you have completed the course successfully. Certificates will be issued by edX under the name of CornellX, designating the institution from which the course originated.

What will help me complete this course?
We have found that the best help you can get is other people in the real world. Enlist friends, co-workers, family, and other people to take the class with you. Ask your friends on Facebook or Twitter. Arrange a time during a lunch break or an evening to discuss the week’s videos and readings. Think of this “MOOC club” like a book club! You will get more out of the material and be much more likely to finish.

I want to read more about American Capitalism!
Professors Baptist and Hyman just wrote a course reader expressly for this MOOC (though it is also being taught at Cornell University).

Containing every reading from the MOOC, as well as additional readings from leading scholars (that could not be had for free!), this course reader provides the student with more background for every topic.

Each reading is introduced and discussed by the professors. Each reading, as well, has additional questions for the student to discuss with their friends.

Are there prerequisites?

This course is designed to be accessible for people without a strong background in U.S. history. Nevertheless, we make reference to many people, locations, events, or developments that may be unfamiliar to some students. Below are sources for additional information.

Wikipedia is a very helpful source for a quick definition or description of most of the material in this course. It can help you answer most factual questions you might have.

Digital History is a website that can serve as an online text book if you need a stronger grounding in U.S. history.

For more difficult questions, you can post a question on the discussion board where your fellow students may be able to help you.

An e-book has been designed for this class, containing all the readings and some additional essays by leading scholars in the history of capitalism, including the professors. American Capitalism: A Reader [Kindle Edition] Amazon.com.

Starts : 2016-01-25
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Business & Management CornellX EdX

Globally, 1 in 11 jobs are in the hospitality industry, with predictions for continued job growth. Hospitality careers are often stereotyped as low-wage and entry-level with little opportunity for advancement, but with constant innovation, opportunities for talented individuals are vast, and growing. 

Are you wondering if a career in hotel management, restaurant management, hotel asset management, or services marketing would benefit you?  Are you currently working in the industry and seeking promotional opportunities?  Enroll now and let Cornell guide your exploration of this exciting industry.

 

FAQ

Who is the intended audience for this course?

The audience for this MOOC is anyone in the industry seeking to advance, as well as individuals who are interested but who don’t know much about the industry. It’s also appropriate for use as an employee-development tool within hospitality industry companies

Are there formal prerequisites?

No. Some proficiency with Excel will be helpful.

Is there a textbook for this course?

No. A list of supplemental resources, will be provided.

What are the topics covered in this course?

  • An Introduction to the Hospitality Industry
  • Strategic Hospitality Management and Innovation
  • Owners, Operators, and Investors: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Investing in the World of Hospitality
  • Marketing the Hospitality Experience
  • Human Resources Management in Hospitality

Starts : 2016-02-23
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] Business English Computer Science CornellX Economics & Finance EdX Math Social Sciences

The course invites you to examine the interconnectedness of modern life through an exploration of fundamental questions about how our social, economic, and technological worlds are connected. Students will explore game theory, the structure of the Internet, social contagion, the spread of social power and popularity, and information cascades.

This MOOC is based on an interdisciplinary Cornell University course entitled Networks, taught by professors David Easley, Jon Kleinberg, and Éva Tardos. That course was also the basis for the book, Networks, Crowds, and Markets: Reasoning About a Highly Connected World. This course is designed at the introductory undergraduate level without formal prerequisites.

Starts : 2016-09-06
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Biology & Life Sciences CornellX EdX

The actions of ordinary people are often absent in studies of urban renewal and urban ecology. Around the world, people who are fed up with environmental degradation and the breakdown of their communities come together to transform blighted vacant lots, trashed-out stream corridors, polluted estuaries, and other “broken places.” Civic ecology practices—such as community gardening, wetlands restoration, river cleanups, and tree planting—are a means for people to express resilience and rebuild communities marked by disaster and disinvestment.

Civic ecology draws on psychology, sociology, political science, education, ecology, and social-ecological systems resilience to understand how and why people care for nature and their communities.

Throughout this course, you will:

  • Explore the people, places, and practices that restore nature and revitalize neighborhoods, making a difference in ways big and small.
  • Discuss and evaluate contemporary thinking in resilience, social-ecological systems, and the relationship between nature and human/community wellbeing.
  • Grasp an understanding of how civic ecology enables those with limited resources to defy and cope with daily struggles, including after disaster and war.
  • Acquire the knowledge and skill set to enact change in your own community.
  • Participate in a civic ecology service learning project to turn classroom learning into real-life application.

This course is ideal for a learner who is intrigued by both social and environmental concerns, or simply has a desire to dive into an emerging 21st century, cross-disciplinary subject area. You will complete this course with a keener awareness of social-ecological issues and concerns, as well as a greater knowledge of the practical steps required to rebuild and maintain community and nature in a world marked by inequality, conflict, and climate change.

Starts : 2014-02-03
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences English CornellX EdX Math Physics Science

The study of the night sky instilled wonder in our ancestors. Modern astronomy extends the human view to previously unexplored regions of space and time. In this course, you will gain an understanding of these discoveries through a focus on relativity—Einstein's fascinating and non-intuitive description of the physical world. By studying relativity and astronomy together, you will develop physical insight and quantitative skills, and you’ll regain a profound sense of wonder for the universe we call home.

 

FAQ

  • What topics will the course cover?
    • Section One—Introduction
    • Section Two—3, 2, 1 … Launching the journey into spacetime
    • Section Three—Special relativity: from light to dark
    • Section Four—General relativity: from flat to curved
  • Is there a required textbook?

    • No textbook is required. Notes will be posted weekly. A list of supplemental resources, including textbooks, will be provided.

  • What are the learning outcomes of this course?

    • Explain the meaning and significance of the postulates of special and general relativity.

    • Discuss significant experimental tests of both special and general relativity.

    • Analyze paradoxes in special relativity.

    • Apply appropriate tools for problem solving in special relativity.

    • Describe astrophysical situations where the consequences of relativity qualitatively impact predictions and/or observations.

    • Describe daily situations where relativity makes a difference.

Starts : 2017-07-25
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Biology & Life Sciences CornellX EdX Environmental Studies UQx

Did you know that you can track some sharks’ movements on Twitter? Or that the scales on their skin have influenced the way humans design boats, planes, and even swim suits? Or that sharks have more senses than humans?

In this biology course, you will learn how scientists study sharks. You will join researchers on location in labs, aquariums, and oceans across the globe to learn about the biodiversity, biology, and conservation of sharks, rays, and chimaeras.

In this activity‑rich course, you’ll track movements of a wild shark, observe shark habitats and behavior, and dig deep into the fossil record. You will also examine topics in the functional anatomy, sensory biology, reproduction, behavior, and ecology of many of the 1,200 living species.

This is an exciting time to be a shark biologist. An explosion of new research methods and technologies are leading to a surprising world of discovery. We’ll introduce new, as well as traditional techniques, for classifying sharks, understanding behavior, and unraveling the mysteries of shark evolution. You’ll be invited to explore global shark populations and consider shark-human interactions and their impacts on history and culture.

You’ll be rewarded by your ability to see virtually any animal with new eyes. Practice thinking like a biologist while honing critical skills that can lead to broader observations about the ongoing history of life on Earth.

Starts : 2017-05-23
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Business & Management CornellX EdX Law

Have you ever needed to lease a car, start a small business, or simply rent an apartment?

Deals are a part of everyday life. Understanding how to construct an effective agreement is critical, and yet, many people are unfamiliar with how an effective agreement is structured and what they can do to support a successful deal. This course features numerous examples of situations in which you may need to make a deal and provides practical information and resources to help you construct successful agreements. 

In this course, we have brought three Cornell Law professors and several practicing attorneys together to provide you with a select range of topics that will serve as a foundation for structuring successful contracts. Together, they possess a wealth of knowledge and experience as legal scholars and distinguished law practitioners.

You will begin with a brief overview of the framework within which laws and contracts are enforced.. You will then focus on various kinds of contract provisions that enable and support successful agreements. You will gain greater familiarity with legal terms and concepts involved in deals, making collaboration with legal counsel more effective.

Starts : 2016-06-13
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Computer Science CornellX EdX

We use our smartphones to communicate, to organize our lives, to find information, and to entertain ourselves. All of this is possible because a smartphone contains a powerful computer processor, which is the subject of this course. This computer science course starts by moving step-by-step through the fundamental layers of computing technology, from binary numbers to application software, and then covers advanced performance techniques and the details of actual smartphone processors.

Learn about:

  • Digital logic
  • Computer organization
  • Instruction sets
  • Application Software
  • Advanced performance techniques
  • Actual smartphone processors

This Course also provides students with the technical knowledge and the Jade design tool experience to succeed in the more advanced MITx 6.004 MOOC - Computation Structures course sequence.

Starts : 2015-04-15
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English CornellX EdX Ethics Food & Nutrition Philosophy & Ethics

You face a difficult moral decision every time you decide what to eat. What impact should animal rights have on your decision? Is the suffering involved in meat, egg and dairy production bad enough that you should go vegan? How do your food choices affect the economy and the environment? Should you become a locavore? Should you eat only sustainably produced, "farm to table" food? Or is factory-farmed food more efficient and ultimately better for the environment?

We also face difficult food-related questions at the political-social level. Should states restrict their citizens' food choices so as to encourage healthy eating? Should governments grant patents on genetically modified crops? And how do we, as a society, implement effective food policies for a rapidly expanding world population?

This class will provide the tools required to reflect clearly and effectively on these challenging questions.

Our goal is to provide a working understanding of some leading ethical theories as well as the central empirical issues related to food production, distribution and consumption. Along the way, students will hear from a variety of scientists, philosophers, activists, and industry participants:

  • Carol Adams, author of The Sexual Politics of Meat
  • T. Colin Campbell, Cornell nutritionist and author of The China Study
  • Mark Bittman, cookbook author and New York Times food writer
  • Marion Nestle, nutritionist and author of Food Politics
  • Joe Regenstein, Cornell food scientist and director of the Kosher-Halal Food Initiative
  • Joel Salatin, alternative farming advocate and author of 9 books
  • Bryant Terry, award-winning chef, author of Vegan Soul Kitchen
  • Brian Wansink, Cornell food and brand psychologist, author of Mindless Eating
     

Starts : 2017-03-01
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English CornellX EdX Food & Nutrition Science Social Sciences

What exactly are genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and why do scientists develop them? Studying the science of GMOs helps us understand biotechnology’s potential role in addressing challenges in agriculture.

In this introductory Food and Nutrition course, you will learn the basics of genetic engineering, explore the political debate around the GMO and review the arguments for and against their use.

We will study the politics surrounding the GMO and its impact at both an individual level and to society as a whole; including the problems, perceptions, benefits, and risks associated with GMOs. Important to understanding the complexities around this topic we will not only be looking at the science behind how the GMO works, but also to the limitations of this science. We will also discuss the importance of information literacy as a tool for effectively identifying and evaluating issues.

Our goal is that this MOOC will impact people's understanding of science, what it can and can't do, and how information is transmitted. The intent is not to influence how people feel about GMOs, but to give them the critical thinking and scientific literacy tools necessary to make informed decisions — and to understand the broader impacts of those decisions.

Starts : 2017-10-03
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] Computer Sciences English CornellX EdX Social Sciences

How does cellular technology enable massive surveillance? Do users have rights against surveillance? How does surveillance affect how we use cellular and other technologies? How does it affect our democratic institutions? Do you know that the metadata collected by a cellular network speaks volumes about its users? In this course you will explore all of these questions while investigating related issues in WiFi and Internet surveillance. The issues explored in this course are at the intersection of networking technology, law, and sociology and will appeal to anyone interested in the technical, political, and moral questions inherent in the use of information networks. The course will include broad overviews for the novice, while pointing to the detailed resources needed for those engaged in the development of corporate or governmental policies.

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