Courses tagged with "Ethics" (13)

Sort by: Name, Rating, Price
Start time: Any, Upcoming, Recent started, New, Always Open
Price: Any, Free, Paid
13 votes
Udemy Free Closed [?] Business Business Ethics Ethics

This series of videos explores the integration of ethics into the business school curriculum and the importance of ethic

Starts : 2015-02-23
No votes
edX Free English EdX Ethics HarvardX History Law Philosophy & Ethics

This course is set to Open-Archived mode. You may register for this course and peruse the content at your own pace, but at this time you may not pursue a certificate.

How can Iran be stopped from getting a nuclear bomb—negotiations, sanctions, or military action? As a participant in this course, you will advise the president in deciding whether, and how, the U.S. should act. Once you’ve made your assessment, you will move on to wrestle with other scenarios preoccupying policy makers. Between the Assad regime and ISIS, civilians in Syria and Iraq face unimaginable atrocities. Should the U.S. intervene? China’s rise is rattling capitalist economies and a half-century of Pacific peace. What counterbalancing actions should Washington take? Leaks are a fact of life — but why do they happen? Who gets them, and why? Should journalists publish or withhold them? Does legal accountability lie with the leaker—or the journalist?

This six-week course casts you as advisors on the hardest decisions any president has to make. We will go behind the veil to see the dynamic between the press and the U.S. government, to explore these dilemmas. We will also have to contend with the reality that government secrets rarely stay that way. Participants will learn to navigate the political landscape of an era in which private remarks become viral tweets, and mistakes by intelligence agencies become front-page stories.

Weekly assignments require strategic thinking: Analyzing dynamics of challenges and developing strategies for addressing them.  Students will learn to summarize their analyses in a succinct “Strategic Options Memo,” combining careful analysis and strategic imagination with the necessity to communicate to major constituencies in order to sustain public support. They will also examine how policymaking is affected by constant, public analysis of government deliberations.

 
Ways to take this course

From this page, you may register to view the content for the Open version of this course. It has also been offered in the past as an intensive online course (limited enrollment, by application only). Admitted participants took the course on a private platform, read approximately 75 pages per week, completed and received individual feedback on assignments including four short policy memos, participated in sections led by the course Teaching Fellows, and engaged with fellow learners in moderated discussion forums. Information on any plan to offer future Limited Enrollment versions will be posted to this page.

 

 

HarvardX requires individuals who enroll in its courses on edX to abide by the terms of the edX honor code : https://www.edx.org/edx-terms-service. HarvardX will take appropriate corrective action in response to violations of the edX honor code, which may include dismissal from the HarvardX course; revocation of any certificates received for the HarvardX course; or other remedies as circumstances warrant. No refunds will be issued in the case of corrective action for such violations. Enrollees who are taking HarvardX courses as part of another program will also be governed by the academic policies of those programs.

HarvardX pursues the science of learning. By registering as an online learner in an HX course, you will also participate in research about learning. Read our research statement : http://harvardx.harvard.edu/research-statement to learn more.

Harvard University and HarvardX are committed to maintaining a safe and healthy educational and work environment in which no member of the community is excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination or harassment in our program. All members of the HarvardX community are expected to abide by Harvard policies on nondiscrimination, including sexual harassment, and the edX Terms of Service. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact harvardx@harvard.edu and/or report your experience through the edX contact form : https://www.edx.org/contact-us.

 

Starts : 2017-05-02
No votes
edX Free English Biology & Life Sciences Business & Management Chemistry Computer Science Data Analysis & Statistics Economics & Finance

This overview course is designed to show new students how to take a course on edx.org. You will learn how to navigate the edX platform and complete your first course! From there, we will help you get started choosing the course that best fits your interests, needs, and dreams.

Starts : Apr 19, 2013/strong br
1 votes
Canvas.net Free Closed [?] General & Interdisciplinary Studies Ethics Humanities Linguistics and Philosophy

This course presents the academic foundations and historical development of multicultural moral decision-making and helps students develop their ability to interrelate reflectively, responsibly, and respectfully with a society of increasing intercultural connections. Students will first explore how people approach moral decision-making, and then how multicultural and intercultural moral decision-making ought to be made. This approach is analogous to how grammar first describes the way language is in fact used, and how it then prescribes the way language ought to be used. A blend of online instructional strategies will be utilized throughout this course. Students can expect to spend three to six hours per week to complete and submit all course deliverables. Preparation for exams will require additional time. Upon successful completion of this course, students should have the ability to engage in serious reflection on issues of ethics and values related to intercultural and multicultural decision-making. Required Text: $49.99 Jeffrey W. Bulger, MORAL PHILOSOPHY: A Theoretical and Practical Approach to Moral Decision-Making, Vol 1-8, Plato

Starts : 2015-11-17
No votes
edX Free English Amnesty InternationalX EdX Ethics Humanities Social Sciences

Freedom of expression is a human right. Learn from the experts at Amnesty International how to claim and defend your rights in this human rights course.

This short course will equip you with the knowledge to understand and claim your right to freedom of expression, and the skills and confidence to take action to defend it.

You will be challenged to think critically and devise effective actions to defend the human rights of others. You will be able to adapt the human rights of freedom of expression, association and assembly to real life situations and come face-to-face with human rights activists on the front line of human rights defense.

This is Amnesty International’s first human rights MOOC. Be prepared for active, fast-paced learning, connecting with course participants across the world to bridge the gap between theory and practice and turn yourself into an agent of change.

You will explore human rights through case studies, including real cases of individuals at risk. You will discover how actions are developed to defend people against human rights violations.

Course facilitators and moderators from across the human rights movement will listen, guide and interact with participants.

Consider signing up with a friend or group to take part in optional group activities together. Join the conversation on the Amnesty International Human Rights Education Facebook page.

No previous knowledge is needed. Register today to take part in a global human rights experience.

Starts : 2017-04-15
1 votes
edX Free General & Interdisciplinary Studies English Biology & Life Sciences EdX Ethics GeorgetownX Humanities Law

Should we clone humans? What should we think of the coming genetic revolution? How much control should we have over how and when we die? When does medical treatment turn into medical enhancement — and should we care? Is rationing health care good, bad, necessary — or all of the above?

This course will explore fundamental moral issues that arise in medicine, health, and biotechnology. Some are as old as life itself: the vulnerability of illness, the fact of death. Some are new, brought on by a dizzying pace of technology that can unsettle our core ideas about human nature and our place in the world. And nearly all intersect with issues of racial and gender equality, as well as policies affecting the world’s most vulnerable populations.

Designed to introduce students to the range of issues that define bioethics, together with core concepts and skills, this course should be of interest to undergraduates, health care professionals, policy makers, and anyone interested in philosophy or ethics.

Before your course starts, try the new edX Demo where you can explore the fun, interactive learning environment and virtual labs. Learn more.

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] General & Interdisciplinary Studies Ethics Humanities Linguistics and Philosophy Political Science

Students of political science should understand how ethics, culture, religion, and morality help to shape public debate, policymaking, and policy execution. This course will provide you with an overview of the role that ethical, cultural, religious, and moral principles play in the formulation and execution of public policy by lawmakers and other public officials. After studying the foundational theories of ethics and morality in politics, you will review arguments about existing issues in domestic and international policy, studying each dilemma from a variety of perspectives.  Common themes seen in ethics debates include justice, equality, fairness, individual liberty, free enterprise, charity, fundamental human rights, and minimizing harm to others. These themes are integrated into various decision-making models, such as the Utilitarian Approach, the Fairness and Justice Approach, and the Rights Approach. In the execution of public policy, it is impossible to do no harm to others; often, public policy…

2 votes
Open.Michigan Initiative, University of Michigan Free Public Affairs & Law American politics Ethics Politic Public policy Values

This course seeks to make students sensitive to and articulate about the ways in which moral and political values come into play in the American policy process, particularly as they affect non-elected public officials who work in a world shaped by politics. Topics covered include the tensions between ethics and politics, an introduction to various moral theories that figure in contemporary policy debates, a consideration of the principal values that animate American politics, and issues and dilemmas in professional ethics. The course addresses issues that affect international as well as U.S. policy and politics. Course Level: Graduate This Work, PubPol 580 - Values, Ethics, and Public Policy, by John Chamberlin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

Starts : 2014-10-06
No votes
edX Free Health and Welfare English Biology & Life Sciences DavidsonX EdX Ethics Humanities Literature

This class engages students in a transdisciplinary conversation about representations of HIV/AIDS: in science writing, journalism, visual art, literature, drama, and popular culture. We believe that scientists and cultural critics can learn valuable lessons from one another, even as they create their own responses to HIV/AIDS. Today, over 30 years since the first scientific reports of HIV/AIDS, the pandemic remains a major health concern throughout the world. But, rays of hope have led to speculation that an AIDS-free generation may be possible. In such a timely moment, it is essential for us to connect across the "two cultures" as we consider the social and scientific implications of HIV/AIDS.

Courses offered via edX.org are not eligible for academic credit from Davidson College. A passing score in a DavidsonX course(s) will only be eligible for a verified certificate generated by edX.org.

Starts : 2016-04-11
No votes
edX Free English DelftX EdX Energy & Earth Sciences Engineering Ethics

There is no doubt that technological innovation is one of the key elements driving human progress. However, new technologies raise ethical questions, have serious implications for society and the environment and pose new risks, often unknown and unknowable before the new technologies reach maturity.

For example, how can we make sure that “smart cities” and other data-based services strike a balance between the benefits the service provides and the risks it poses to the security of citizens? What are the ethical questions surrounding self-driving vehicles or autonomous weapons? What are the health risks of nanotechnologies? All these create new risks and raise serious ethical questions. The challenge is to innovate in a way that benefits both companies and society – to innovate responsibly.

This course provides both a theoretical and practical framework for assessing and designing responsible innovations, combined with real-world examples. The first part (weeks 1 and 2) of the course focuses on ethical questions and concerns, such as: a fair distribution of costs and benefits, moral obligations and individual and collective responsibilities. The second part (weeks 3 and 4) deals with (unknown) risks and safety of new technologies including a number of qualitative and quantitative risk assessment methods. The last part of the course (weeks 5, 6 and 7) is about the management of responsible innovations and evolving a new, value driven, design process.

Case studies during the course include nanotechnology, self-driving vehicles, smart meters for electricity, autonomous weapons, nuclear energy and CO2capture and storage together with their related ethical and safety concerns.  Affordable innovations for low-income groups and emerging markets are also covered in the course.

The course includes a free e-book.

The course will be of benefit to innovation and risk managers, entrepreneurs, policy analysts, engineers, designers and strategic advisors who are looking for a methodical approach with which to judge responsible innovations.

 

5 votes
Open.Michigan Initiative, University of Michigan Free Computer Sciences Avatars Ethics Information technology Privacy Wiki

Ethics and Information Technology focuses on the ethical dilemmas that exist where human beings, information objects, and social computing technologies interact. The course explores emerging ethical models from historical and cross-cultural perspectives and then applies these models to a variety of new and emerging technologies that are inherently social in their construction and use. Initial examples of issues that the course covers in discrete modules include: the integrity of digital content in a networked world; identity and avatars; and interpersonal engagement through online games and virtual environments. Students explore the technological underpinnings of associated technology systems, experiment with individual and group interaction with technologies, and examine the mechanics of ethical and unethical behaviors. Course Level: Undergraduate This Work, SI 410 - Ethics and Information Technology, by Paul Conway is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

Starts : 2015-04-15
No votes
edX Free English CornellX EdX Ethics Food & Nutrition Philosophy & Ethics

You face a difficult moral decision every time you decide what to eat. What impact should animal rights have on your decision? Is the suffering involved in meat, egg and dairy production bad enough that you should go vegan? How do your food choices affect the economy and the environment? Should you become a locavore? Should you eat only sustainably produced, "farm to table" food? Or is factory-farmed food more efficient and ultimately better for the environment?

We also face difficult food-related questions at the political-social level. Should states restrict their citizens' food choices so as to encourage healthy eating? Should governments grant patents on genetically modified crops? And how do we, as a society, implement effective food policies for a rapidly expanding world population?

This class will provide the tools required to reflect clearly and effectively on these challenging questions.

Our goal is to provide a working understanding of some leading ethical theories as well as the central empirical issues related to food production, distribution and consumption. Along the way, students will hear from a variety of scientists, philosophers, activists, and industry participants:

  • Carol Adams, author of The Sexual Politics of Meat
  • T. Colin Campbell, Cornell nutritionist and author of The China Study
  • Mark Bittman, cookbook author and New York Times food writer
  • Marion Nestle, nutritionist and author of Food Politics
  • Joe Regenstein, Cornell food scientist and director of the Kosher-Halal Food Initiative
  • Joel Salatin, alternative farming advocate and author of 9 books
  • Bryant Terry, award-winning chef, author of Vegan Soul Kitchen
  • Brian Wansink, Cornell food and brand psychologist, author of Mindless Eating
     

Starts : 2017-04-24
No votes
edX Free General & Interdisciplinary Studies English Business & Management EdX Ethics Philosophy & Ethics Science Social Sciences

We will explore the psychology of our everyday thinking: why people believe weird things, how we form and change our opinions, why our expectations skew our judgments, and how we can make better decisions. We’ll discuss and debate topics such as placebos, the paranormal, medicine, miracles, and more.

You will use the scientific method to evaluate claims, make sense of evidence, and understand why we so often make irrational choices. You will begin to rely on slow, effortful, deliberative, analytic, and logical thinking rather than fast, automatic, instinctive, emotional, and stereotypical thinking.

We will provide tools for how to think independently, how to be skeptical, and how to value data over personal experience. We will examine the mental shortcuts that people use and misuse, and apply this knowledge to help make better decisions, and improve critical thinking.