Courses tagged with "Fine Arts" (252)

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Starts : 2011-02-01
19 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Fine Arts Infor Information control Information Theory Nutrition

This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon.

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Starts : 2017-03-31
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Business Fine Arts How to Succeed Nutrition

Learn about one of the greatest engineering efforts in human history: NASA’s Project Apollo and the space race to put a man on the moon.

Apollo 11 landed on the moon in 1969, just eleven years after the first successful satellite launch (Sputnik in 1957) and forty-three years after Robert Goddard’s launch of the world’s first liquid fueled rocket. But the history of rocket development actually can be traced back more than 2,000 years to the experiments of Archytas, an ancient Greek Philosopher.

This aerospace history course will take you back in time and trace the many developments in technology that transformed rockets from celebratory accouterments to weapons and finally to launchpads for human space travel. It is a story of technology, but ultimately the emphasis on this course is about people. Some are very well-known, but others not so.

You will learn how the Chinese introduced rockets as weapons, how early experimenters succeeded through trial and error, how scientific advancement provided the foundation for rocket development and space travel, and how rocket use spread throughout the world prior to the modern era. Finally, you will be introduced to the contributions of rocket pioneers such as Tsiolkovsky, Oberth and Goddard who dreamed of and paved the way for space travel. The course culminates with an introduction of German rocket development in the early 1930s and the emergence the genius rocket engineer Wehner von Braun.  

Verified students are eligible to earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs) and Professional Development Hours (PDHs), valid toward continuing education requirements for many professional certifications.

Starts : 2017-06-27
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Business Fine Arts Nutrition

In this course, we’ll trace the evolution of the rocket, from rudimentary battlefield weapon to essential vehicle in the exploration of space.

Beginning with Germany’s effort to avoid the restrictions of the Treaty of Versailles by developing rockets, you will learn how Wernher von Braun led the German effort during WWII. The course will then follow several parallel paths, including simultaneous rocket development in the US and in the Soviet Union, home of another rocket engineering genius, Sergei Korolev.

The end of WWII saw both the US and Soviet Union in a rush to acquire as much rocket technology as possible. You’ll learn how the Cold War between the US and the Soviet Union drove this development and the roles both von Braun and Korolev played in the creation of these advanced rockets.

The course then traces how von Braun and Korolev led the transformation from rockets of war to rockets for space exploration. Von Braun’s and Korolev’s contributions created the space age.

You will learn how Korolev’s R-7, the world’s first intercontinental ballistic missile became the launch vehicle for the world’s first artificial satellite, Sputnik. And you will learn how in the US, now working with Von Braun, used the Redstone ballistic missile to launch their first satellite, called Explorer.

The course culminates with the formation of NASA and America’s official entry it what would soon be called the “Space Race” between the US and the Soviet Union.

Starts : 2005-09-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Fine Arts Infor Information environments Information Theory Nutrition

There has been much discussion in recent years, on this campus and elsewhere, about the death of the book. Digitization and various forms of electronic media, some critics say, are rendering the printed text as obsolete as the writing quill. In this subject, we will examine the claims for and against the demise of the book, but we will also supplement these arguments with an historical perspective they lack: we will examine texts, printing technologies, and reading communities from roughly 1450 to the present. We will begin with the theoretical and historical overviews of Walter Ong and Elizabeth Eisenstein, after which we will study specific cases such as English chapbooks, Inkan knotted and dyed strings, late nineteenth-century recording devices, and newspapers online today. We will also visit a rare book library and make a poster on a hand-set printing press.

Starts : 2003-09-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Fine Arts Infor Information control Information Theory Nutrition

This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Starts : 2004-02-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Fine Arts Infor Information control Information Theory Nutrition

This subject explores the legal history of the United States as a gendered system. It examines how women have shaped the meanings of American citizenship through pursuit of political rights such as suffrage, jury duty, and military service, how those political struggles have varied for across race, religion, and class, as well as how the legal system has shaped gender relations for both women and men through regulation of such issues as marriage, divorce, work, reproduction, and the family. The course readings will draw from primary and secondary materials in American history, as well as some court cases. However, the focus of the class is on the broader relationship between law and society, and no technical legal knowledge is required or assumed.

Starts : 2017-09-09
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Business Chemokines Fine Arts Nutrition

In this global history course, you will learn not just by reading and watching lectures, but also by analyzing historical documents and applying your knowledge. The core of this course is a series of weekly lab assignments in which you and your fellow students will work in teams to use historical knowledge from the course to solve problems and develop new connections and interpretations of primary historical materials.

The course begins in 1300 AD at the height of the Silk Road, the triumphs of the Mongol Empire, and the spread of one of the most devastating contagions of all time, the Black Death. It examines the emergence of an international system of competitive empires and its effect on trade and exchange. We look at the Age of Revolution, and discuss industrialization during the 1800s. The course concludes with a close look at the 20th century and current-day globalization.

Course themes include migration and statelessness, economic integration, warfare and conflict, the transformation of the ecological balance, and cultural responses and innovations. To grapple with these themes, we explore first-hand perspectives of historical actors through a collection of texts and images.


This course integrates and actively supports groups of refugee learners in refugee camps in the Horn of Africa and Jordan, collaborating with students at Princeton, in a global learning partnership with InZone at the University of Geneva. This partnerships benefits from collaboration with the United Nations High Commission for Refugees in Azraq and Kakuma refugee camps, CARE in Azraq refugee camp and British Council in Amman, and from financial support from Princeton University, the University of Geneva and the Ford Foundation. We express our sincere appreciation to all who contribute to the implementation of this global learning project.


Course material
For you to engage in this experience, Global History Lab will provide you with historical content and a series of collaborative lab activities. Although the lectures are designed to be self-contained, we recommend (but do not require) that you refer to the book Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: A History of the World: From 1000 CE to the Present (Fourth Edition) (vol. 2), which was written specifically for this course.

Starts : 2017-02-08
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Business Fine Arts Game+development Nutrition

Using examples of investigative and crusading journalism from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Europe, this course will help you understand how raising public awareness can create political and social change.

This course is a fast-paced introduction to global muckraking, past and present, and includes penetrating interviews with historians and investigative journalists.

Join us to discover the vital role that journalism has played in fighting injustice and wrongdoing over the last 100 years and delve into the current trends reshaping investigative reporting in the digital age.

Starts : 2016-10-31
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Business C Chemokines Fine Arts KIx Nutrition

In the first act of William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, the Ghost of the dead King of Denmark appears to his son, setting off a chain of events that culminates in the play’s notoriously bloody finale. But how would this mysterious figure have been understood in Shakespeare’s world?

Harvard professor Stephen Greenblatt (John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities) guides learners through an exploration of the Ghost in Hamlet, considering both its uncanny theatrical power and the historical contexts from which it emerged. Learners will be introduced to the narrative sources of Hamlet, the religious convictions that shaped how people in Renaissance England understood the afterlife, and the ways that Shakespeare’s Ghost would have thrilled and challenged its original audience. Learners will also be invited to share their own theatrical interpretations of Hamlet and to consider how the themes of death, mourning, and memory shape Shakespeare’s play as well as their own lives.


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Starts : 2016-07-05
No votes
edX Free Closed [?] English Business C Chemokines Fine Arts Nutrition

Ever wondered about the sacred scriptures that have sustained for millennia one of the oldest and most diverse religions of the world - Hinduism? Want to discover the lessons this history may offer mankind in the 21st century?

This religion course introduces the rich and diverse textual sources from which millions of Hindus have drawn religious inspiration for millennia. The Bhagavad Gita has offered philosophical insights to a number of modern thinkers. This course will introduce important passages from important Hindu sacred texts, their interpretations by moderns and will give you an opportunity to engage with them.

This course in part of the World Religions Through Their Scripture XSeries Program.

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Nutrition Taking derivatives

In this course, we will study the emergence of the major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century A.D. We will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of timefrom fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced and consolidated civilizations. To do this, we will rely upon textbook readings to provide historical overviews of particular civilizations and then utilize primary-source documents to illuminate the unique features of these individual societies. By the end of the course, you will possess a thorough understanding of important overarching social, political, religious, and economic themes in the ancient world, ranging from the emergence of Confucian philosophy in Asia to the fall of imperial Rome. You will also understand how many aspects of these ancient civilizations continue to remain relevant in today’s world.

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will introduce you to the history of the world’s major civilizations from medieval times to the early modern era.  You will learn about the pivotal political, economic, and social changes that took place in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe during this period.  The course will be structured chronologically, with each unit focusing on the expansion or decline of a particular civilization or the interactions and exchanges between civilizations.  The units will include representative secondary and primary source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the transformation of western Europe during the Renaissance, the emergence of a more inclusive world economy, and the impact of early European exploration and colonization.  By the end of the course, you will understand how many different civilizations evolved from isolated societies into expansive, interconnected empires capable of exerting global influence.

5 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will present a comparative overview of world history from the 17th century to the present era.  You will examine the origins of major economic, political, social, cultural, and technological trends of the past 400 years and explore the impact of these trends on world societies.  This course will be structured chronologically and thematically, with each unit focusing on a significant historical subject.  The units will include representative primary-source documents and images that illustrate important overarching themes, such as the emergence of modern nation-states, the economic and technological interactions between Western and non-Western peoples, the changing social and cultural perceptions about religion and the state, and the development of physical and virtual networks of information exchange. This course is designed to align with Thomas Edison State College TECEP examination. Visit the TECEP website [1], and click on “World History from 1600 to Present (HIS-126-TE)” to download t…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will introduce you to historical research methods and familiarize you with the tools and techniques that historians use to study the past.  You will learn about the process of modern historical inquiry and gain a better understanding of the diverse resources that historians use to conduct research.  The course will be structured topically.  The first four units will focus on research methodology and examine how and why historians conduct research on the past.  Later units will examine how different historical resources can be used for historical research.  By the end of the course, you will understand how to conduct research on past events and be familiar with the variety of physical and electronic resources available for historical research.

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will introduce you to the history of Europe from the medieval period to the Age of Revolutions in the eighteenth century.  You will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe during this 800-year period.  The course will be structured chronologically.  Each unit will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, European expansion overseas, and the French Revolution.  By the end of the course, you will understand how Europe had transformed from a fragmented and volatile network of medieval polities into a series of independent nation-states by 1800.

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will introduce you to the history of Europe from 1800 to present day.  You will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe during this period.  This course is structured chronologically, with each unit focusing on a particular historical event or trend.  Each unit will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the Industrial Revolution, the First and Second World Wars, imperialism, and the Cold War.  By the end of this course, you will understand how nationalism, industrialization, and imperialism fueled the rise of European nation-states in the nineteenth century, as well as how world war and oppressive regimes devastated Europe during the 1900s.

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Flash Objects Matrix+transformations Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will introduce you to United States history from the colonial period to the Civil War and Reconstruction. You will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in America during this 250-year period. The course will be structured chronologically, with each unit focusing on a significant historical subject in early American history. The units will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the development of British America, the founding of the American republic, and the crisis of the federal union that led to the Civil War. By the end of the course, you will understand how the American federal union was founded, expanded, and tested from 1776 to its collapse in 1861.

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Flash Objects Matrix+transformations Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will introduce you to United States history from the end of the Civil War in 1865 through the first decade of the twenty-first century. You will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in America during this nearly 150-year period. The course will be structured chronologically, with each unit focusing on a significant historical subject. The units will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the growth and expansion of political representation and civil rights in America, industrial development and economic change, race and ethnicity in American society, and cultural change over time. These primary documents offer you insights into the thinking of people who directly witnessed and experienced these historical developments. By the end of the course, you will understand how the United States grew from a relatively weak and divided agricultural nation into a cohesive mil…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will introduce you to the history of Latin and South America from the year in which European explorers first discovered and began to colonize the region to the early 19th century, when many Latin and South American colonies declared their independence from European rule.  You will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin and South America during this 400-year period.  The course will be structured chronologically.  Each unit will include representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as the conquest of native peoples by European explorers, colonial settlement patterns and trade networks, social and cultural exchanges between native peoples and Europeans, and the emergence of independence movements across Latin and South America at the end of the 18th century.  By the end of the course, you will understand how the interaction between native peoples and European settl…

6 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Fine Arts Nutrition Taking derivatives

This course will introduce you to the history of Latin America from the early 19th century, when many Latin American colonies declared their independence from European rule (predominately Spain and Portugal), to the present day. This course fulfills one of the required six geographical concentration courses for the History major [1]. This course also fulfills one of the requirements for the History minor [2]. In this course, you will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place throughout Latin America during this crucial 200-year period of nation-state formation and engagement with the rest of the world. The units in the course are set up chronologically, but at the same time the units address the development and history of specific Latin American regions, including Mexico, Central America, and South America, and nation-states. Each unit includes representative primary-source documents that illustrate important overarching political, economic, and social themes, such as ef…

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