Courses tagged with "OpenCourseWare" (2513)

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Starts : 2009-02-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Mathematics MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This is an introductory course in algebraic combinatorics. No prior knowledge of combinatorics is expected, but assumes a familiarity with linear algebra and finite groups. Topics were chosen to show the beauty and power of techniques in algebraic combinatorics. Rigorous mathematical proofs are expected.

Starts : 2015-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Mathematics Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence on Algebraic Geometry. The goal of the course is to introduce the basic notions and techniques of modern algebraic geometry. It covers fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field; relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties; and examples with emphasis on algebraic curves and surfaces. This course is an introduction to the language of schemes and properties of morphisms.

Starts : 2009-02-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Mathematics Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This course provides an introduction to the language of schemes, properties of morphisms, and sheaf cohomology. Together with 18.725 Algebraic Geometry, students gain an understanding of the basic notions and techniques of modern algebraic geometry.

Starts : 2006-02-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Computer Sciences Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This research-oriented course will focus on algebraic and computational techniques for optimization problems involving polynomial equations and inequalities with particular emphasis on the connections with semidefinite optimization. The course will develop in a parallel fashion several algebraic and numerical approaches to polynomial systems, with a view towards methods that simultaneously incorporate both elements. We will study both the complex and real cases, developing techniques of general applicability, and stressing convexity-based ideas, complexity results, and efficient implementations. Although we will use examples from several engineering areas, particular emphasis will be given to those arising from systems and control applications.

Starts : 2006-09-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Mathematics Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is a first course in algebraic topology. The emphasis is on homology and cohomology theory, including cup products, Kunneth formulas, intersection pairings, and the Lefschetz fixed point theorem.

Starts : 2006-02-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Mathematics Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

In this second term of Algebraic Topology, the topics covered include fibrations, homotopy groups, the Hurewicz theorem, vector bundles, characteristic classes, cobordism, and possible further topics at the discretion of the instructor.

Starts : 2015-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Computer Sciences Graduate Mathematics MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is organized around algorithmic issues that arise in machine learning. Modern machine learning systems are often built on top of algorithms that do not have provable guarantees, and it is the subject of debate when and why they work. In this class, we focus on designing algorithms whose performance we can rigorously analyze for fundamental machine learning problems.

Starts : 2014-09-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

6.890 Algorithmic Lower Bounds: Fun with Hardness Proofs is a class taking a practical approach to proving problems can't be solved efficiently (in polynomial time and assuming standard complexity-theoretic assumptions like P ≠ NP). The class focuses on reductions and techniques for proving problems are computationally hard for a variety of complexity classes. Along the way, the class will create many interesting gadgets, learn many hardness proof styles, explore the connection between games and computation, survey several important problems and complexity classes, and crush hopes and dreams (for fast optimal solutions).

Starts : 2002-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Computer Sciences Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

Animation is a compelling and effective form of expression; it engages viewers and makes difficult concepts easier to grasp. Today's animation industry creates films, special effects, and games with stunning visual detail and quality. This graduate class will investigate the algorithms that make these animations possible: keyframing, inverse kinematics, physical simulation, optimization, optimal control, motion capture, and data-driven methods. Our study will also reveal the shortcomings of these sophisticated tools. The students will propose improvements and explore new methods for computer animation in semester-long research projects. The course should appeal to both students with general interest in computer graphics and students interested in new applications of machine learning, robotics, biomechanics, physics, applied mathematics and scientific computing.

Starts : 2014-09-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

This is a graduate-level introduction to the principles of statistical inference with probabilistic models defined using graphical representations. The material in this course constitutes a common foundation for work in machine learning, signal processing, artificial intelligence, computer vision, control, and communication. Ultimately, the subject is about teaching you contemporary approaches to, and perspectives on, problems of statistical inference.

Starts : 2003-02-01
8 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Social Sciences History History of America MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

The Great Depression and World War II permanently changed American politics and society. Topics include: the Great Crash, the New Deal, Roosevelt, the home front, the Normandy Invasion, and the atomic bomb. Explores those events through film, novels, newspapers, and other historical documents.

Starts : 2012-02-01
6 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences History MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course focuses on the Great Depression and World War II and how they led to a major reordering of American politics and society. We will examine how ordinary people experienced these crises and how those experiences changed their outlook on politics and the world around them.

Starts : 2000-09-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Social Sciences History MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course examines the American experience at home and abroad from Pearl Harbor to the end of the Cold War. Topics include: America's role as global superpower, foreign and domestic anticommunism, social movements of left and right, suburbanization, and popular culture.

Starts : 2003-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] English & Literature Literature MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and in-class reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate.

Starts : 2003-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Literature MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and in-class reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate.

Starts : 2013-09-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free English & Literature Literature MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel.

Starts : 2006-02-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free English & Literature History MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This subject is devoted to reading and discussing basic American historical texts that are often cited but often remain unread, understanding their meaning, and assessing their continuing significance in American culture. Since it is a "Communications Intensive" subject, 21H.105 is also dedicated to improving students' capacities to write and speak well. It requires a substantial amount of writing, participation in discussions, and individual presentations to the class.

Starts : 2007-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences History MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the "good life" through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Starts : 2007-02-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Ethnic Studies Anthropology MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Americans have historically preferred to think of the United States in classless terms, as a land of economic opportunity equally open to all. Yet, social class remains a central fault line in the U.S. Subject explores the experiences and understandings of class among Americans positioned at different points along the U.S. social spectrum. Considers a variety of classic frameworks for analyzing social class and uses memoirs, novels and ethnographies to gain a sense of how class is experienced in daily life and how it intersects with other forms of social difference such as race and gender.

Starts : 2010-09-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science Undergraduate

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

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