Courses tagged with "Political Science" (166)

Sort by: Name, Rating, Price
Start time: Any, Upcoming, Recent started, New, Always Open
Price: Any, Free, Paid
110 votes
Khan Academy Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law American Civics American Government Political Science

Videos about how government works in the United States. PPACA or "Obamacare". The Fiscal Cliff. More Fiscal Cliff Analysis. Electoral College. Primaries and Caucuses. Deficit and Debt Ceiling. Government's Financial Condition. Social Security Intro. FICA Tax. Medicare Sustainability. SOPA and PIPA. Pension obligations. Illinois pension obligations. PPACA or "Obamacare". The Fiscal Cliff. More Fiscal Cliff Analysis. Electoral College. Primaries and Caucuses. Deficit and Debt Ceiling. Government's Financial Condition. Social Security Intro. FICA Tax. Medicare Sustainability. SOPA and PIPA. Pension obligations. Illinois pension obligations.

Starts : 2010-09-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science Undergraduate

This course covers the history of American foreign policy since 1914, current policy questions, and the future of U.S. Policy. We focus on policy evaluation. What consequences did these policies produce for the U.S. and for other countries? Were/are these consequences good or bad?

Starts : 2004-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course examines the causes and consequences of American foreign policy since 1898. Course readings cover both substantive and methods topics. Four substantive topics are covered:

  1. major theories of American foreign policy;
  2. major episodes in the history of American foreign policy and historical/interpretive controversies about them;
  3. the evaluation of major past American foreign policies--were their results good or bad? and
  4. current policy controversies, including means of evaluating proposed policies.

Three methods topics are covered:

  1. basic social scientific inference--what are theories? what are good theories? how should theories be framed and tested?
  2. historical investigative methodology, including archival research, and, most importantly,
  3. case study methodology.

Historical episodes covered in the course are used as raw material for case studies, asking "if these episodes were the subject of case studies, how should those studies be performed, and what could be learned from them?"

Starts : 2002-09-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Military Science & Protective Services MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science Undergraduate

This course examines the problems and issues confronting American national security policymakers and the many factors that influence the policies that emerge. But this is not a course about "threats," military strategies, or the exercise of military power.

What threatens those interests? How should the U.S. defend those interests? What kind of military should we build? Should the U.S. enter into alliances with other countries? Do we need a larger Navy? How much should we spend on weapons procurement?

The course has four broad goals:

  • to demonstrate that definitions of national security and the specification of vital interests are subjective and fluid and that they are as much functions of domestic politics as they are responses to international politics and "objective threats";
  • to demonstrate that policy decisions involve complex tradeoffs among political, social, economic, military, legal, and ethical goals and values;
  • to explore how the many organizations, institutions, and individuals that participate in American national security policymaking affect policy formulation, implementation, and outcomes; and
  • to better understand the historical context, evolution, and linkages of national security problems and solutions.

The course is organized along an historical time line. Beginning with the final days of World War II we follow American national security policy from the first stirrings of confrontation with the Soviet Union and China, into two hot wars in Asia that cost over 100,000 American lives and spawned social upheavals, through a close encounter with nuclear war, stumbling into the era of arms control, and conclude with the collapse of the communism. Selective case studies, memoirs, and original documents act as windows into each period. What were US national security decision makers thinking? What were they worried about? How did they see their options?

Starts : 2004-02-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Public Affairs & Law MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science Undergraduate

This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Starts : 2004-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Starts : 2009-09-01
18 votes
Open Yale Free Business English Political Science

In this course, we will seek to interpret capitalism using ideas from biological evolution: firms pursuing varied strategies and facing extinction when those strategies fail are analogous to organisms struggling for survival in nature. For this reason, it is less concerned with ultimate judgment of capitalism than with the ways it can be shaped to fit our more specific objectives--for the natural environment, public health, alleviation of poverty, and development of human potential in every child. Each book we read will be explicitly or implicitly an argument about good and bad consequences of capitalism.

Starts : 2009-02-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science Undergraduate

The causes and prevention of interstate war are the central topics of this course. The course goal is to discover and assess the means to prevent or control war. Hence we focus on manipulable or controllable war-causes. The topics covered include the dilemmas, misperceptions, crimes and blunders that caused wars of the past; the origins of these and other war-causes; the possible causes of wars of the future; and possible means to prevent such wars, including short-term policy steps and more utopian schemes.

The historical cases covered include the Peloponnesian and Seven Years wars, World War I, World War II, Korea, the Arab-Israel conflict, and the U.S.-Iraq and U.S. al-Queda wars.

This is an undergraduate course, but it is open to graduate students.

Starts : 2003-09-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course explores the causes of modern war with a focus on preventable causes. Course readings cover theoretical, historical, and methodological topics. Major theories of war are explored and assessed in the first few weeks of the class, asking at each stage "are these good theories?" and "how could they be tested?" Basic social scientific inference -- what are theories? What are good theories? How should theories be framed and tested? -- and case study methodology are also discussed. The second half of the course explores the history of the outbreak of some major wars. We use these cases as raw material for case studies, asking "if these episodes were the subject of case studies, how should those studies be performed, and what could be learned from them?"

Starts : 2013-09-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course explores the leading theoretical and methodological approaches to studying China's interaction with the international system since 1949. Readings include books and articles that integrate the study of China's foreign policy with the field of international relations.

Starts : 2009-02-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Public Affairs & Law MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science Undergraduate

China's rise as a great power raises important questions about how that power might be used in its relations with other states. Nowhere are such questions more salient than in the future trajectory of China's conflict behavior, including its approach to deterrence, crisis management and the use of force. To explore these important questions in China's international relations, this seminar examines the evolution of Chinese strategic thought, in primary sources as well as its reflection in the interactions among Chinese states and between China and other states.

Starts : 2003-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Public Affairs & Law Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions:

  • Does justice require granting group-differentiated rights?
  • Do group-differentiated rights conflict with liberal and democratic commitments to equality and justice for all citizens?
  • What, if anything, can hold a multi-religious, multicultural society together? Why should the citizens of such a society want to hold together?

Related Content

Starts : 2004-09-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

In recent years both scholars and policymakers have expressed a remarkable amount of interest in the concepts of social capital and civil society. A growing body of research suggests that the social networks, community norms, and associational activities signified by these concepts can have important effects on social welfare, political stability, economic development, and governmental performance. This discussion based course examines the roles played by these networks, norms, and organizations in outcomes ranging from local public goods provision and the performance of democracies to ethnic conflict and funding for terrorism.

Starts : 2010-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course surveys the social science literature on civil war. Students will study the origins of civil war, discuss variables that affect the duration of civil war, and examine the termination of conflict. This course is highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases.

Starts : 2003-02-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Military Science & Protective Services Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course centers on mechanisms of civilian control of the military. Relying on the influential texts of Lasswell, Huntington, and Finer, the first classes clarify the basic tensions between the military and civilians. A wide-ranging series of case studies follows. These cases are chosen to create a field of variation that includes states with stable civilian rule, states with stable military influence, and states exhibiting fluctuations between military and civilian control. The final three weeks of the course are devoted to the broader relationship between military and society.

Starts : 2015-10-13
No votes
Iversity Free Closed [?] English Political Science

This MOOC was developed by four eminent scientists who together authored the health chapter in the recent 5th Assessment report of the IPCC. They offer you a short crash-course into the topic of climate change, tailored to senior policy-makers and negotiators of climate agreements, particularly as an input into the climate conference COP21 in Paris in December this year.

This 1 week MOOC requires 3 hours of investment time and provides hard evidence for four key arguments as to why health is and should be central in climate policy.


Two positive arguments:

1. Health is a positive motivator, a driving force for citizens and policy-makers to care about and act on climate change.

2. The huge health co-benefits must enter the risk-benefit calculations.


However, two arguments pertain to the restrictions that our health and physiology impose on humans under climate change, particularly in a world that is +4°C warmer:

1. There are health limits to adaptation.

2. Decreased work productivity in hot countries.


Finally, we should consider health as an indicator, not only for sustainable development, but also for climate policy.

Who should take this MOOC?

Senior, experienced members of climate negotiation teams from all 195 member states of the UNFCC. The course is launched to allow policy-makers involved in the Climate Conference COP21 in Paris 2015 to take it as part of their brief.
In addition, any policy maker at local, national, regional and global levels would benefit from the course, but in keeping with the philosophy of MOOCs, the course is open to any citizen interested in the topic.

What do I need to know?

Participants should be familiar with the essentials of the climate systems and the current debate on mitigation and adaptation policies, as well as proposals for fair financing of the shared but differentiated responsibilities of rich and poor countries, which are the agenda of the COP21 conference.

What will I learn?

(i) The participant will understand why health is not another sector but a key argument in developing climate policy and fair share of the burden and benefits of climate policies.

(ii) The participant will learn the scientific evidence behind the four key climate policy arguments based on human health:

1. Health is a positive motivator, a driving force for citizens.

2. The huge health co-benefits must enter the risk-benefit calculations.

3. There are health limits to adaptation.

4. Decreased work productivity in hot countries.

Course Structure

The course is organised in 4 lectures, each developing the evidence for the 4 health arguments, which we propose are inherent in all negotiations on climate policy:

1. Health is a positive motivator, a driving force for citizens.

2. The huge health co-benefits must enter the risk-benefit calculations.

3. There are health limits to adaptation.

4. Decreased work productivity in hot countries.

The four short lectures (8 minutes) are complementary and follow a common storyline. So it is desirable that the participants watch all of them. This would be an essential useful minimum of investment.

We offer 7 optional quiz questions for each lecture in case the participant wishes to check on his or her comprehension of the factual information provided.

Our discussion forums are key to our MOOC concept. This enables participants to engage in an exchange of views and information on any topic they wish related to the course topic. The course instructor and his assistant will actively participate in the forums.

Weekly YouTube feedback video: The course instructor will personally answer questions that are of great common interest or are frequently asked during a weekly youtube video, put on line each Friday at 2pm CET.

Personal email feedback: The instructor and our team will be available to respond to individual questions and comments directed at us through internal mail during the 3 months of the course will be online.

Starts : 2008-09-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This is an applied theory course covering topics in the political economy of democratic countries. This course examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus will be placed on institutions from a comparative and/or international perspective.

Starts : 2004-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Military Science & Protective Services Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course will conduct a comparative study of the grand strategies of the great powers (Britain, France, Germany and Russia) competing for mastery of Europe from the late nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. Grand strategy is the collection of political and military means and ends with which a state attempts to achieve security. We will examine strategic developments in the years preceding World Wars I and II, and how those developments played themselves out in these wars. The following questions will guide the inquiry: What is grand strategy and what are its critical aspects? What recurring factors have exerted the greatest influence on the strategies of the states selected for study? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? What consequences seem to follow from grand strategies of different types? A second theme of the course is methodological. We will pay close attention to how comparative historical case studies are conducted.

Starts : 2004-09-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Health and Welfare MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science Undergraduate

This course examines in comparative prospective the health care policy problems facing the United States including providing adequate access to medical services for all, the control of rising health care costs, and the assurance that the quality of health care services is high and improving. It explores the market and regulatory policy options being debated politically in the United States to solve these problems and compares possible foreign models for reform including those offered by the Canadian, British, Japanese, and German systems. The course shows how the historical development of the American health care system limits greatly policy options that can be considered and creates pressures that favor a continuing emphasis on technology and structural decentralization. The course also examines important health risks and the political and organizational factors that distort the public's understanding of these risks.

Starts : 2002-09-01
21 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This graduate seminar has two main goals: to explore the main theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of contemporary Chinese politics; and to relate those approches to broader trends in the field of comparative politics. What has the study of China contributed to the field of comparative politics, and vice versa? What are the most effective ways to integrate area studies, broader comparative approaches, and theory? Seminar presumes a basic understanding of the history and politics of contemporary China.