Courses tagged with "Psychology" (35)

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Starts : 2014-03-11
107 votes
Coursera Free Closed [?] Business English Brain and Cognitive Sciences Business & Management Economics & Finance Health & Society Humanities Introduction to Psychology

Behavioral economics couples scientific research on the psychology of decision making with economic theory to better understand what motivates financial decisions. In A Beginner’s Guide to Irrational Behavior, you will learn about some of the many ways in which we behave in less than rational ways, and how we might overcome our shortcomings. You’ll also learn about cases where our irrationalities work in our favor, and how we can harness these human tendencies to make better decisions.

Starts : 2015-05-04
No votes
Iversity Free Closed [?] English Psychology

Course Summary

Genius, talent and golden mediocrity are different dimensions of human existence. Our course shows how these three dimensions manifest themselves in life and how you can fulfill your genius, abilities, talents more fully and completely.

The course is of an applied nature and is oriented to studies in the field of creative life intensification psychology, help with the experience of crises, human potential realization and care. It may be useful for professional psychologists, for specialists whose activity involves empathy, inspiration, understanding and creating of daily life, and for all who are interested in the topic. The course is made in the popular form of short videos relying on free network resources users.

What will I learn?

A phenomenological description of genius, talent and golden mediocrity as specific dimensions of human life, correction of errors and misapprehensions of common sense. We critically examine the manifestations of the studied "dimensions" (phenomena), in order that by putting off all "the supposed" we could find specific and inherent meaning. The phenomenological method is to understand and express in simple terms the fundamental structure of creative activity, to express everything that was, that is and that will be important in the psychology of creative life.

What do I need to know?

No prior knowledge of phenomenology of genius, talent and mediocrity is needed in order to attend the MOOC. General cultural knowledge, interest in creativity, phenomenology, and psychology is welcome. It is advisable to understand what benefits a person in general and a student of this course in particular to have an access for literary writings, for the environment (online in our case) to meet with people, for travels, for participation in the upbringing of children, etc. We assume that students will be quite tolerant to some uncertainty in the process of clarifying the meanings and fundamentals for the intensive creative life.

Our target audience: students of psychology, social sciences, art; professional psychologists; specialists whose activity involves empathy, inspiration, understanding and creating of daily life; everyone who is interested in the topic.

Course Structure

General Course Outline

Three chapters: Genius, Talent, Golden mediocrity.

There are three modules in each chapter.

In each module there are 6 topics.

Each module takes one week of studying.

There are 54 topics – video clips including lectures and visual examples.

After each lecture you are provided with understanding questions and creative activities.

Talent is what is given. Care for the world. Motivation.

Mediocrity is means, tools, instruments, resources. Efficiency.

Genius reveals itself.

Talent is allowed (we allow it to come out).

Mediocrity develops.

Talent and socialization

Violent mediocrity

Talented people, mediocre minds

Examples of mechanical systems

Examples of biological organisms

Examples of human will

Examples of creative events

Examples of miracles in daily life

Am I a GENIUS (intonational stress on the word “GENIUS”)

I, a genius? (intonational stress on the word “I”)

I am a genius! (inspiring statement)

Complete Course outline

GENIUS

1. Am I a GENIUS?

Very often what people think about genius is not correct.

Examples of definitions and opinions from dictionaries and textbooks.

Meanings of genius – primacy, care for fundamentals, wholeness, sufficiency, initiative.

Phenomenological thinking “Exact Fantasy” by Goethe.

Genius and evil can be combined unfortunately, more often than we can imagine.

1.1. Doubts about genius

1.2. Misbeliefs about genius

1.3. Phenomenology of doubts about genius

1.4. Method of worthy doubts about genius

1.5. Risks of doubts about genius

1.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

2. I, a genius?

One cannot seek genius, it always ‘already exists’.

Genius is not combined with ambitions; one cannot want to become genius.

Genius is not combined with motivation, it is often contrary to the wishes.

Changing while responding.

Method of responsive phenomenology.

Genius is a trial for a person.

2.1. Doubts about your own genius

2.2. Misbeliefs about your own genius

2.3. Phenomenology of doubts about your own genius

2.4. Method of worthy doubts about your own genius

2.5. Risks of doubts about your own genius

2.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

3. I am a genius!

“In each of us a genius is sleeping. And day by day he sleeps tighter and tighter”.

Genius holds a lot, if not everything, it doesn’t exclude mediocrity and talent. You can talk about genius mediocrity or genius talent.

A man is a genius to the extent to which he is full of initiative to life renewal.

To be a genius means to surround oneself with genius phenomena and allow others and the whole world to be genius.

3.1. Confidence in genius in general and in your own genius in particular

3.2. Misbeliefs about confidence in genius

3.3. Phenomenology of confidence in genius

3.4. Method of confidence in genius

3.5. Risks of confidence in genius

3.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

TALENT

4. Am I talented?

By being talented we often imply abilities to create. In reality talent is an ability to repeat something.

Talent is care for the world.

Talents become obvious after we lose them.

Aiming for something that doesn’t belong to us can suppress abilities. It is a Deal with the Devil – to give away your abilities for someone’s achievements.

4.1. Doubts about talents

4.2. Misbeliefs about talents

4.3. Phenomenology of doubts about talents

4.4. Method of worthy doubts about talents

4.5. Risks of doubts about talents

4.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

5. I, talented?

Yes, I am talented, but what are my talents?

This is my talent and I don’t have to force myself to do it.

Over-motivation.

Sensitivity.

Too serious concern about myself. Loss of humor.

5.1. Doubts about your own talents

5.2. Misbeliefs about your own talents

5.3. Phenomenology of doubts about your own talents

5.4. Method of worthy doubts about your own talents

5.5. Risks of doubts about your own talents

5.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

6. I am talented!

To the extent to which we are connected with the world, with life.

To accept something, to enrich it and to give it to the world.

Creative self-expression and self-fulfillment.

Being obsessed with the result.

6.1. Confidence in talents in general and in your own talents in particular

6.2. Misbeliefs about confidence in talents

6.3. Phenomenology of confidence in talents

6.4. Method of confidence in talents

6.5. Risks of confidence in talents

6.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

MEDIOCRITY (defined as such: another name for the Golden Mean was golden mediocrity)

7. Am I mediocrity?

Very often it is considered to be offensive, but to be mediocre is good if it happens at the right time.

Something average, the mean, repeating itself, normal, something between.

The principle of economy.

Identification with the means only.

7.1. Doubts about mediocrity

7.2. Misbeliefs about mediocrity

7.3. Phenomenology of doubts about mediocrity

7.4. Method of worthy doubts about mediocrity

7.5. Risks of doubts about mediocrity

7.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

8. I, mediocrity?

Is wrongly associated with lack of talent.

To live well according to their means (without debts).

The principle of balance.

Violent mediocrity.

8.1. Doubts about your own mediocrity

8.2. Misbeliefs about your own mediocrity

8.3. Phenomenology of doubts about your own mediocrity

8.4. Method of worthy doubts about your own mediocrity

8.5. Risks of doubts about your own mediocrity

8.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

9. I am mediocrity!

It is not correct to suggest that if I am mediocre, then I cannot be a master in something.

Freedom from circumstances and effectiveness.

The principle of sustainability in motion.

Negligence to the world and a too cautious attitude to the media (the means).

9.1. Confidence in mediocrity in general and in your own mediocrity in particular

9.2. Misbeliefs about confidence in mediocrity

9.3. Phenomenology of confidence in mediocrity

9.4. Method of confidence in mediocrity

9.5. Risks of confidence in mediocrity

9.6. Examples of experience

Learning activities

Starts : 2014-04-28
No votes
FutureLearn Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Introduction to Psychology Psychology Queen's University Belfast

This course introduces the learner to issues around the use of public space to express identity.

Starts : 2007-03-01
16 votes
Open Yale Free Social Sciences English Psychology

What do your dreams mean? Do men and women differ in the nature and intensity of their sexual desires? Can apes learn sign language? Why can’t we tickle ourselves? This course tries to answer these questions and many others, providing a comprehensive overview of the scientific study of thought and behavior. It explores topics such as perception, communication, learning, memory, decision-making, religion, persuasion, love, lust, hunger, art, fiction, and dreams. We will look at how these aspects of the mind develop in children, how they differ across people, how they are wired-up in the brain, and how they break down due to illness and injury.

No votes
Canvas.net Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Introduction to Psychology Psychology

This course is ideal for students who would like to build their foundational knowledge of the field of psychology. It also provides an introduction for anyone who is interested in the enduring understanding of the field of psychology such as:
-Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.
-Intuition and introspection are helpful to understanding psychology, but often fail us.
-The evolution of Psychology as a discipline is one which moves from intuition and introspection towards a more scientific approach.
-Different schools of Psychology investigate different aspects of the effects of environment and biology on behavior; there is no one "right" approach.
Learning objectives for this course are: 1. To identify theoretical underpinnings of the major areas of psychology, including cognition (thought, memory, perception), learning, personality, social and environmental influences, development, and physiology of behavior. 2. To explain different models of human behavior based on science versus intuition or general ways of knowing. 3. To recognize ways of pursuing questions in Psychology via discussion of theory and empirical research 4. To describe connections between knowledge gained in Psychology to everyday life.

3 votes
Open.Michigan Initiative, University of Michigan Free Health and Welfare Development Developmental stages Exercise Growth Impaired homeostatis Life Span Developmental Psychology

This course addresses essential learning outcomes in normal growth, development and nutrition across the lifespan, inclusive of aging. Its focus is on normal function rather than disease. Level: First Year Medical Students Unless otherwise noted this Work, Human Growth and Development, by Brent Williams is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Introduction to Psychology Psychology

This course will introduce you to the fundamental principles of psychology and to the major subjects of psychological inquiry. It has been designed to not only provide you with the tools necessary for the study of psychology but to present you with a sampling of the major areas of psychology research. The course begins with a short overview of how psychology developed as an academic discipline and an introduction to a number of the principle methodologies most commonly deployed in its study. The subsequent units are arranged around broad areas of research, including emotion, development, memory, and psychopathology. We will focus on well-substantiated research and current trends within each of these categories. This course is designed to align with Excelsior College’s UExcel Psychology examination. Visit the Excelsior website [1] to download the content guide for the PSYX-101 exam.  For more information about this partnership, and earning credit through Excelsior College, go here [2].    [1] http:/…

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Introduction to Psychology Psychology

This course will introduce you to the fundamental principles of psychology and to the major subjects of psychological inquiry. It has been designed to not only provide you with the tools necessary for the study of psychology but to present you with a sampling of the major areas of psychology research. The course begins with a short overview of how psychology developed as an academic discipline and an introduction to a number of the principle methodologies most commonly deployed in its study. The subsequent units are arranged around broad areas of research, including emotion, development, memory, and psychopathology. We will focus on well-substantiated research and current trends within each of these categories.

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Introduction to Psychology Psychology Social Sciences

In this course, we will look at the properties behind the basic concepts of probability and statistics and focus on applications of statistical knowledge.  We will learn how statistics and probability work together.  The subject of statistics involves the study of methods for collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data.  Statistics formalizes the process of making decisionsand this course is designed to help you cultivate statistic literacy so that you can use this knowledge to make better decisions.  Note that this course has applications in sciences, economics, computer science, finance, psychology, sociology, criminology, and many other fields. Every day, we read articles and reports in print or online.  After finishing this course, you should be comfortable asking yourself whether the articles make sense.  You will be able to extract information from the articles and display that information effectively.  You will also be able to understand the basics of how to draw statistical conclusions.

2 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Psychology Research Methods in Psychology

This Research Methods course is part one of the two-part Research Methods series, which also includes the Research Methods Lab course. Research is the foundation on which any solid science is built. This course will introduce you to research methodologies frequently used in the social sciences and especially those used in the field of psychology. It is important that you are able to not only identify the techniques used by others but also employ them yourself. The course is designed to provide you with the foundation you will need to apply certain techniques in the search for your own answers. The course will begin with an overview of how research, and its appropriate methodology, came about in science and, more specifically, psychology. We will then go over the ABCs of conducting research, learning how to define “variables” and why they are important. While this course will also touch upon statistics and their importance, it will not require a comprehensive knowledge of the subject. The course will concl…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Psychology

This Research Methods Lab course is part two of the Research Methods series. You should not attempt this course without having first completed the Research Methods course (PSYCH202A [1]). This Lab extends beyond the basics of research methodology and the logic of experimental design, concepts you learned in PSYCH202A [2].  You will learn to put these concepts into practice while conducting laboratory experiments. While we may not explicitly apply all of the concepts introduced in the Research Methods lecture course, remember that each of them will remain relevant during the evaluation and review phases of your research. This course intends to acquaint the student with a variety of different research techniques.  Students will participate in every stage of experimentation, from creation and editing to evaluation and review.   As such, this course will not only review relevant concepts from the Research Methods lecture, but will also broach a number of practical matters, including the standard organizatio…

5 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Psychology

This introductory course in biology starts at the microscopic level, with molecules and cells.  Before we get into the specifics of cell structure and behavior, however, let’s take a cursory glance at the field of biology more generally.  Though biology as we know it today is a relatively new field, we have been studying living things since the beginning of recorded history.  The invention of the microscope was the turning point in the history of biology; it paved the way for scientists to discover bacteria and other tiny organisms, and ultimately led to the modern cell theory of biology. You will notice that, unlike the core program courses you took in chemistry and physics, introductory biology does not have many mathematical “laws” and “rules” and does not require much math.  Instead, you will learn a great number of new terms and concepts that will help you describe life at the smallest level.  Over the course of this semester, you will recognize the ways in which the tiniest of molecules…

2 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Psychology

In BIO101 [1], you were introduced to biology on a microscopic scale when you learned about the functions of molecules, genes, and cells.  In this course, you will learn about biological changes that happen on a very large scale, across entire populations of organisms and over the course of millions of years, in the form of evolution and ecology.  Evolution, the process by which different species of organisms have developed and diversified from earlier forms, has been a central theme in the field of biology ever since Darwin first published his theories about it.  Mounting evidence from many different branches of science all point to the fact that species have experienced a gradual but definite physical change.  In this course, we will learn about evolution and theories that stem from evolution. We will also learn about ecology, the study of the interactions between different types of organisms and their surroundings.  Changes in surroundings will force organisms to adapt and changeoften in terms of th…

10 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Abnormal Psychology Clinical psychiatry Psychiatric disorders Psychiatry Psychology Social Science

DISCLAIMER: This course is designed to address the fundamentals of clinical psychology. It will NOT provide the education or experience needed for the diagnosing and treating of mental disorders. This course will cover the basic concepts of clinical psychology, or the study of diagnosing, treating, and understanding abnormal and maladaptive behaviors. We frequently refer to these behaviorswhich include depression, anxiety, and schizophreniaas mental diseases or disorders. While you might have a general understanding of these disorders, this course will cover each in great detail. Many of you are likely familiar with the idea of therapy, whether because you or someone you know has been in therapy, or because you have seen it in popular TV shows or movies. Because many approaches to therapy draw from research on clinical populationsthat is, populations suffering from some sort of mental disordertherapy is closely related to the field of psychopathology. Although this class will not teach you how to cond…

No votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Cognitive Psychology Psychology

This course will introduce you to cognitive psychology, or the study of the ways in which we come to know about the world around us and about one another.  While you may understand “cognition” as “thinking” or “thoughts,” we will here use the term to refer to almost any process that takes place within the human mind. Though cognitive psychology as a formal branch of study has only been around since the late 1960s, it has been studied for decades as an area of interest in psychological inquiry and has its roots in philosophy.  In the late 1880s, for example, Ebbinghaus conducted some of the very first scientifically based studies of cognition when he attempted to explain the mechanism of memory.  Memory, along with attention, perception, language, and decision making, are amongst the most prominent issues within the broad and diverse field of cognitive psychology.  While we could spend an entire semester exploring just one of these issues, this course will instead provide you with an overview…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Business & Management Health & Society Psychology Social Psychology Social Science

This course will introduce you to the concepts and ideas in the area of social psychology. Social Psychology aims to discover the different ways in which people interact with other individuals, groups, and the larger society as a whole, as well as why people act in certain ways. As with an anthropology or sociology course, social psychology looks at the inner workings of groups of people. However, it differs from these courses in terms of its focus; social psychology focuses primarily on the single individual’s psychology as part of the group or society, rather than the culture or group interaction (though both of these areas have some relevance in social psychology). This may seem to be quite a broad subject area and it is. Humans are social creatures (in other words, they have evolved to be able to interact and communicate at high levels with individuals of their own species) and almost invariably exist in a social context (even a situation in which society is absent could be studied by social psychologi…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Development Developmental stages Growth Impaired homeostatis Life Span Developmental Psychology Longevity

Developmental psychology concerns itself with the changes (psychological and otherwise) that occur as a result of our physical and mental maturation. Typically, “development” refers to the systematic changes that take place between our conception and death. While this definition may seem quite broad, it will serve as a good starting point in our quest to understand the field of developmental psychology. The first thing we must realize as developmental psychologists is that our change is systematic. This means that the process by which we grow and mature over time is not defined by random, isolated events but by orderly and relatively long-term patterns. This also means that while individuals themselves may differ quite a bit, the developmental patterns that they undergo are similar. These concepts are crucial in that they allow us, as psychologists, to study the way in which people develop and to make predictions about the future based on that development. Developmental psychologists study both continuiti…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Culture Education Educational Psychology Learning Psychology Social Science

PURPOSE OF COURSE…

No votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Psychology

PURPOSE OF COURSE…

5 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Brain and Cognitive Sciences Introduction to Psychology Psychology Social Sciences

This course will introduce you to the major concepts of and debates surrounding industrial and organizational psychology. Industrial and organizational psychology is the application of psychological research and theory to human interaction (both with other humans and with human factors, or machines and computers) in the workplace. The phrase “industrial and organizational psychology” (sometimes referred to as “I/O”) may be somewhat misleading, as the field deals less with actual organizations and/or industries and more with the people in these areas. As mentioned above, “I/O” is an applied psychological science, which means that it takes research findings and theories that may have originally been used to explain a general phenomenon of human behavior and applies them to human behavior in a specific setting (here, the workplace). Consider, for example, the fact that many jobs require applicants to take a personality test. Psychologists originally developed this test to detect and diagnose abnorm…

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