Courses tagged with "Saylor.org" (363)

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10 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

This course is designed to introduce you to the study of Calculus.  You will learn concrete applications of how calculus is used and, more importantly, why it works.  Calculus is not a new discipline; it has been around since the days of Archimedes.  However, Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibniz, two 17th-century European mathematicians concurrently working on the same intellectual discovery hundreds of miles apart, were responsible for developing the field as we know it today.  This brings us to our first question, what is today's Calculus?  In its simplest terms, calculus is the study of functions, rates of change, and continuity.  While you may have cultivated a basic understanding of functions in previous math courses, in this course you will come to a more advanced understanding of their complexity, learning to take a closer look at their behaviors and nuances. In this course, we will address three major topics: limits, derivatives, and integrals, as well as study their respective foundations and a…

10 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Abnormal Psychology Clinical psychiatry Psychiatric disorders Psychiatry Psychology Social Science

DISCLAIMER: This course is designed to address the fundamentals of clinical psychology. It will NOT provide the education or experience needed for the diagnosing and treating of mental disorders. This course will cover the basic concepts of clinical psychology, or the study of diagnosing, treating, and understanding abnormal and maladaptive behaviors. We frequently refer to these behaviorswhich include depression, anxiety, and schizophreniaas mental diseases or disorders. While you might have a general understanding of these disorders, this course will cover each in great detail. Many of you are likely familiar with the idea of therapy, whether because you or someone you know has been in therapy, or because you have seen it in popular TV shows or movies. Because many approaches to therapy draw from research on clinical populationsthat is, populations suffering from some sort of mental disordertherapy is closely related to the field of psychopathology. Although this class will not teach you how to cond…

10 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

The physics of the universe appears to be dominated by the effects of four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism, weak nuclear forces, and strong nuclear forces.  These forces control how matter, energy, space, and time interact to produce our physical world.  All other forces, such as the force you exert in standing up, are ultimately derived from these fundamental forces. We have direct daily experience with two of these forces: gravity and electromagnetism.  Consider, for example, the everyday sight of a person sitting on a chair.  The force holding the person on the chair is gravitational, and that gravitational force balances with material forces that “push up” to keep the individual in place.  These forces are the direct result of electromagnetic forces on the nanoscale.  On a larger stage, gravity holds the celestial bodies in their orbits, while we see the universe by the electromagnetic radiation (light, for example) with which it is filled.  The electromagnetic force also makes…

10 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Business Business Administration Economics Economics & Finance Introduction to Microeconomics Microeconomics

The purpose of this course is to provide you with a basic understanding of the principles of microeconomics.  At its core, the study of economics deals with the choices and decisions that have to be made in order to manage scarce resources available to us. Microeconomics is the branch of economics that pertains to decisions made at the individual level, i.e. by individual consumers or individual firms, after evaluating resources, costs, and tradeoffs.  When we talk about “the economy,” then, we are referring to the marketplace or system in which these choices interact with one another.  In this course, we will learn how and why these decisions are made and how they affect one another in the economy. Each of the following units has been designed as a building block, where the concepts you learn in one unit will enable you to understand the material you discover in the next.  By the end of this course, you will have a strong grasp on the major issues that face microeconomists, including consumer and p…

10 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Business Job Search Skills

Welcome to PRDV103: Interviewing Skills.  This course is the third in a series of four courses included in the Job Search Skills Program that also includes Job Search Skills, Resume Writing, and Professional Etiquette.  The Interviewing Skills course is intended to help you showcase your personality, strengths, interests, and abilities to potential employers.  At this stage of your career exploration, you will have researched and targeted appropriate jobs and have marketed yourself to these employers with an attention-getting resume.  If you have not already done so and feel you would benefit from more information about how to conduct a successful job search, or how to formulate a resume that gets you that interview, please explore the other exciting courses in this track.

10 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Business Career Advancement

Though accounting may seem like a dense and complex subject, this course is designed to present the accounting cycle in an accessible and logical manner.  This course will provide you with a solid understanding of basic accounting principles and will introduce you to financial statement analysis.  Please note that this course is the first of two courses on the principles of accounting and that each of these two courses is divided into 10 units.  Each unit should take approximately three hours to complete and should be completed sequentially for the most logical progression of information.  As you work through these units, you will encounter a range of examples and problem sets geared towards providing you with practical applications of the lessons you learn.  By the end of this course, you will able to create accurate and appropriate financial statements to convey a company’s financial health. This course begins with an introduction to financial accounting and the various ways in which financial stat…

9 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Basic Genetics Biology Biology & Life Sciences Genetics Science

Genetics is the branch of biology that studies how traits are passed on from one generation to the next and why there are similarities and differences between related individuals. Prior to the discovery of genes, scientists knew that parents passed something down to their offspring, but they did not know how or what. Gregor Mendel’s famous experiments with peas indicated that certain features, such as pea texture and flower color, are encoded by two sets of traits and that the parental traits can be separated. Decades later, scientists discovered that parents passed down DNA, which was present in chromosomes. Since the discovery of DNA, we have come to appreciate the importance of chromosomes. Genomics is a relatively new field with the bold aim of understanding the function of every single gene in a genome, including the human genome. This field took off with the completion of the first sequenced genome, and after the completion of the Human Genome Project, it has attracted increasing research. Mendelian…

9 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

Biotechnology is the application of biology and biological concepts to science and engineering.  It is the crossroad of the biological sciences with other major disciplines of science, from organic chemistry to mechanical engineering.  The earliest applications of biotechnology involve people of ancient civilizations using organisms to create bread and wine.  The discovery of the Penicillium mold to combat infection is another famous example, as its production involved a specially designed fermentation process using microorganisms.  Nowadays, scientists use almost all aspects of biology in their applications, from DNA to protein to cellular organelles.  Living organisms, especially microorganisms, are thought of as biochemical machinery, able to be edited and changed to create new purposes.  We could program them to create insulin for diabetes patients or to produce fuel for our cars.  Biotechnology is nearly limitless in its applications. As biotechnology is a very diverse topic, this course will in…

9 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science Social Sciences

Research is an important component of political science; it enables us to uncover evidence, develop theories, and better understand how the political world operates. This course will introduce you to some of the basic research tools in the political scientist’s “toolkit,” and discuss why and how certain tools are used to explore certain phenomena. The course will also teach you to develop and evaluate sensible and systematic scientific research designs by addressing the ways in which data and theory intersect and examining how political scientists quantify, measure, and operationalize the concepts and variables that are key to understanding the political world. You will conclude your studies by learning about the practical implementation of research design. By the end of this course, you will better understand the qualitative and quantitative techniques that are used within the field and will be able to explain why political scientists choose to use them. In this regard, you will have the opportunity to…

9 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Communication

Effective public relations skills are essential to so much of the success in private and public spheres.  Public relations efforts address how we wish to present ourselves to others and how to deal with the perceptions of who others believe we are.  Public relations tactics are useful for large international corporate projects, or something as personal as networking for your own career advancement. If you are taking this course as part of a communications major, you may well find most every other course in the program is based on addressing how we relate to others.  The field of public relations takes the theories of human interaction and applies these theories for real-life results. This course will help prepare you to conduct public relations suitable for small start-up businesses, international companies, political campaigns, social programs, personal development, and other outreach projects.  There are many tools useful to effective public relations.  As we review the components of a public relat…

9 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Mathematics

This course is a continuation of the first-semester course titled Introduction to Computer Science I (CS101 [1]).  It will introduce you to a number of more advanced Computer Science topics, laying a strong foundation for future academic study in the discipline.  We will begin with a comparison between Javathe programming language utilized last semesterand C++, another popular, industry-standard programming language.  We will then discuss the fundamental building blocks of Object-Oriented Programming, reviewing what we learned last semester and familiarizing ourselves with some more advanced programming concepts.  The remaining course units will be devoted to various advanced Computer Science topics, including the Standard Template Library, Exceptions, Recursion, Searching and Sorting, and Template Classes.  By the end of the class, you will have a solid understanding of Java and C++ programming, as well as a familiarity with the major issues that programmers routinely address in a professional setting.

9 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

Zoology is the scientific study of diversity of animal life, classification, physiology, behavior, and evolution. Unicellular organisms have evolved into complex multicellular forms. Organisms, both unicellular and multicellular, in various complex shapes and sizes are found in almost every habitat and environment. The field of zoology includes many subfields of biology as well as a vast diversity of unicellular and multicellular organisms. Animals first appeared in the fossil record an estimated 600 million years ago as multicellular protozoa. Over the next 70 million years, they radiated into an incredible number of different invertebrate phyla (which represent the majority of animal groups and species), and in the next 150 million years, vertebrate and invertebrate species began to colonize the land. Though the history of animals is extensive and the fossil record at times is conflicted and vague, understanding the historical connections between animals is important in order to understand modern-day rela…

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Computer Sciences Computer Science

The World Wide Web (WWW) has become the primary means by which we conduct searches and perform billing transactionsevents that can only occur with the support of specific applications.  The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the design and development of such applications.  This course will expose you to the basic fundamentals of the Internet and Web protocols, the different architectures that Web-related applications use, and the programming languages that enable the development of Web applications, placing particular emphasis on JavaScript, HTML, XML, AJAX, and Java Server Pages (JSP).  We will also cover matters of security and reliability in the development of web applications via the use of transport encryption and authentication.

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Business Business Administration

Today, the management of information systems is mostly associated with databases, the Internet, and server rooms.  However, “information management” has been around since before the invention of these tools.  It is as old as commerce itself, as traders, bankers, and merchants have always had reason to track sales and inventory.  Creditors must be aware of how much capital has been lent to borrowers and how much money has been deposited at banks.  Long before humans harnessed electricity, there was a need for information systems.  But currently almost all management of information systems is done electronically. Management Information Systems (MIS) is a formal discipline within business education that bridges the gap between computer science and the well-known business disciplines of finance, marketing, and management.  However, most students will only take one or two MIS courses in their undergraduate programs. You may not know it, but you use MIS every day.  If you use email, you are using MIS…

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] English & Literature Education English English Composition English Language English Literature Humanities

No matter what career you pursue, you must be able to communicate effectively and clearly if you want to be successful.  This course will enhance your ability to do so by sharpening your critical thinking and writing skills.  We will begin with a unit designed to change the way in which you think about writing.  First, you will learn to think of writing not as a solitary act but as a conversation between yourself and an audience.  In this light, writing becomes a dynamic, interactive, and creative rather than a rote practice.  You will also begin to value writing as a process an admittedly difficult one  rather than a product.  You will come to see that writing is an act of discovery rather than a recitation of prefabricated ideas. Because this course is designed specifically for students in a university setting, the second unit will focus on academic writing.  We will learn how to respond to an assignment or test question by using the “PWR-Writing” or “Power-Writing” Method (PWR: Pre-write…

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Computer Sciences Computer Science

This course will introduce you to modern operating systems.  We will focus on UNIX-based operating systems, though we will also learn about alternative operating systems, including Windows.  The course will begin with an overview of the structure of modern operating systems.  Over the course of the subsequent units, we will discuss the history of modern computers, analyze in detail each of the major components of an operating system (from processes to threads), and explore more advanced topics in the field, including memory management and file input/output.  The class will conclude with a discussion of various system-related security issues.

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Physical Sciences Mechanical Engineering

Heat transfer is the thermal energy in transit due to a spatial temperature difference. The topic of heat transfer has enormous applications in mechanical engineering, ranging from cooling of microelectronics to design of jet engines and operations of nuclear power plants. In this course, you will learn about what heat transfer is, what governs the rate of heat transfer, and why heat transfer is so important. You will also learn about the three major modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation.  Heat conduction is the transport of heat through a solid body, by vibrations of molecules or in the case of electrical conductors, by movement of electrons from one molecule to another. Heat convection is a process by which heat is transferred through a fluid by motion of fluid. Thermal radiation is the transport of energy between two bodies by electromagnetic waves. In addition to the three main modes of heat transfer, you will also learn about heat transfer during phase changes (boiling and conden…

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Philosophy

This class provides an in-depth introduction to the philosophical problems surrounding death.  It takes its starting point in the fact that everyone, eventually, will die.  This is one of the few facts that human beings can be absolutely sure about.  Given this certainty, however, death still presents us with many difficult and pressing questions. What does it mean to die in the first place?  Who or what is the “person” that dies?  Is it merely a physical body, or is it also something like a soul, and, if so, does the existence of a soul indicate that there is some hope of immortality?  Moreover, what should our attitude toward death be?  Should we think of it as a good thing or a bad thing?  And what effect should it have on the way we live our lives?  At some point in our lives, we all grapple with these questions.  This course uses the doctrines and arguments of a number of prominent philosophers concerning death as a means to investigate these and other questions.  The course is organized a…

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Life Sciences Biology

As you learned in BIO101 [1], the cell is the fundamental unit of life; in fact, the smallest living organisms are composed of a single cell. We have learned that, despite their small size, cells are far from simple, and we have only recently begun to understand just how complex they are. This course will present you with a detailed overview of a cell’s main components and functions. Most of the units will cover topics familiar to you from BIO101, such as mitosis or the cell nucleus, but will explore them in greater depth. The course is organized roughly into four major areas: the cell membrane, cell nucleus, cell cycle, and cell interior. We will approach most of these topics straightforwardly, from a molecular and structural point of view. [1] http://www.saylor.org/courses/bio101a/…

8 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Public Affairs & Law Political Science

This course will serve as an introduction to American government and politics. We will focus on several major themes in the course’s five constituent units. In the first unit, “American Political Foundations,” we will consider the core concepts and theoretical underpinnings of the American system of government: American political culture, the Constitution, and federalism. A solid grasp of these concepts will help you better understand the underlying reasons for the structure of the American political system. In the second unit, “American Political Behavior,” we will examine the key components of “politics” in the American system, including public opinion, the mass media, political parties, interest groups, campaigns, elections, and electoral participation. In the third unit, “American Institutions,” we will analyze the major governing bodies in the United States: Congress, the presidency and the bureaucracy, and the courts. Unit 4, “Civil Rights and Civil Liberties in America,” will high…

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