Courses tagged with "Undergraduate" (39)

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Starts : 2004-09-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course will acquaint the student with some of the ancient Greek contributions to the Western philosophical and scientific tradition. We will examine a broad range of central philosophical themes concerning: nature, law, justice, knowledge, virtue, happiness, and death. There will be a strong emphasis on analyses of arguments found in the texts.

Starts : 2009-09-01
20 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Ancient Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Special Programs Undergraduate

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Starts : 2009-09-01
5 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Social Sciences MIT OpenCourseWare Special Programs Undergraduate

Western philosophy and theoretical mathematics were born together, and the cross-fertilization of ideas in the two disciplines was continuously acknowledged throughout antiquity. In this course, we read works of ancient Greek philosophy and mathematics, and investigate the way in which ideas of definition, reason, argument and proof, rationality and irrationality, number, quality and quantity, truth, and even the idea of an idea were shaped by the interplay of philosophic and mathematical inquiry.

Starts : 2009-02-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Starts : 2016-02-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course will introduce you to the Western philosophical tradition through the study of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Cavendish, Hume, and Kant. You'll grapple with questions that have been significant to philosophy from its beginnings: Questions about the nature of the mind, the existence of God, the foundations of knowledge, and the good life. You'll also observe changes of intellectual outlook over time, and the effect of scientific, religious, and political concerns on the development of philosophical ideas.

Starts : 2008-02-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Foundations and philosophical applications of Bayesian decision theory, game theory and theory of collective choice. Why should degrees of belief be probabilities? Is it always rational to maximize expected utility? If so, why and what is its utility? What is a solution to a game? What does a game-theoretic solution concept such as Nash equilibrium say about how rational players will, or should, act in a game? How are the values and the actions of groups, institutions and societies related to the values and actions of the individuals that constitute them?

Starts : 2009-09-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free General & Interdisciplinary Studies Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why?

Starts : 2004-02-01
6 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course is a seminar on creativity in art, science, and technology. We discuss how these pursuits are jointly dependent on affective as well as cognitive elements in human nature. We study feeling and imagination in relation to principles of idealization, consummation, and the aesthetic values that give meaning to science and technology as well as literature and the other arts. Readings in philosophy, psychology, and literature are part of the course.

Starts : 2005-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course examines problems in the philosophy of film as well as literature studied in relation to their making of myths. The readings and films that are discussed in this course draw upon classic myths of the western world. Emphasis is placed on meaning and technique as the basis of creative value in both media.

Starts : 2012-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course explores the values (aesthetic, moral, cultural, religious, prudential, political) expressed in the choices of food people eat. It analyzes the decisions individuals make about what to eat, how society should manage food production and consumption collectively, and how reflection on food choices might help resolve conflicts between different values.

Starts : 2012-09-01
8 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course studies what is language and what does knowledge of a language consist of. It asks how do children learn languages and is language unique to humans; why are there many languages; how do languages change; is any language or dialect superior to another; and how are speech and writing related. Context for these and similar questions is provided by basic examination of internal organization of sentences, words, and sound systems. No prior training in linguistics is assumed.

Starts : 2011-09-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course explores the nature of meaning and truth, and their bearing on the use of language in communication. No knowledge of logic or linguistics is presupposed.

Starts : 2010-09-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

24.901 is designed to give you a preliminary understanding of how the sound systems of different languages are structured, how and why they may differ from each other. The course also aims to provide you with analytical tools in phonology, enough to allow you to sketch the analysis of an entire phonological system by the end of the term. On a non-linguistic level, the course aims to teach you by example the virtues of formulating precise and explicit descriptive statements; and to develop your skills in making and evaluating arguments.

Starts : 2015-09-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course covers some of the basic ideas in the subfield syntax, within the framework often referred to as "Generative Grammar".

Starts : 2005-02-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course gives an introduction to the science of linguistic meaning. There are two branches to this discipline: semantics, the study of conventional, "compositional meaning", and pragmatics, the study of interactional meaning. There are other contributaries: philosophy, logic, syntax, and psychology. We will try to give you an understanding of the concepts of semantics and pragmatics and of some of the technical tools that we use.

Starts : 2012-09-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course studies the development of bilingualism in human history (from Australopithecus to present day). It focuses on linguistic aspects of bilingualism; models of bilingualism and language acquisition; competence versus performance; effects of bilingualism on other domains of human cognition; brain imaging studies; early versus late bilingualism; opportunities to observe and conduct original research; and implications for educational policies among others. The course is taught in English.

Starts : 2004-09-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course is a detailed examination of the grammar of Japanese and its structure which is significantly different from English, with special emphasis on problems of interest in the study of linguistic universals. Data from a broad group of languages is studied for comparison with Japanese. This course assumes familiarity with linguistic theory.

Starts : 2009-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

In this course we will cover central aspects of modern formal logic, beginning with an explanation of what constitutes good reasoning. Topics will include validity and soundness of arguments, formal derivations, truth-functions, translations to and from a formal language, and truth-tables. We will thoroughly cover sentential calculus and predicate logic, including soundness and completeness results.

Starts : 2004-02-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Computer Sciences Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course begins with an introduction to the theory of computability, then proceeds to a detailed study of its most illustrious result: Kurt Gödel's theorem that, for any system of true arithmetical statements we might propose as an axiomatic basis for proving truths of arithmetic, there will be some arithmetical statements that we can recognize as true even though they don't follow from the system of axioms. In my opinion, which is widely shared, this is the most important single result in the entire history of logic, important not only on its own right but for the many applications of the technique by which it's proved. We'll discuss some of these applications, among them: Church's theorem that there is no algorithm for deciding when a formula is valid in the predicate calculus; Tarski's theorem that the set of true sentence of a language isn't definable within that language; and Gödel's second incompleteness theorem, which says that no consistent system of axioms can prove its own consistency.

Starts : 2015-02-01
22 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course is a study of basic metaphysical issues concerning existence, the mind-body problem, personal identity, and causation plus its implications for freedom. This class features classical as well as contemporary readings and it provides practice in written and oral communication.

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