Courses tagged with "Undergraduate" (1404)

Sort by: Name, Rating, Price
Start time: Any, Upcoming, Recent started, New, Always Open
Price: Any, Free, Paid
Starts : 2004-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Anthropology MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This class has been reorganized to focus primarily on the War in Iraq. As in previous years, the class still examines war in cross-cultural perspective, asking whether war is intrinsic to human nature, what causes war, how particular cultural experiences of war differ, and how war has affected American culture.

Starts : 2009-09-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Anthropology MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This class examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. We investigate this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Concepts include traditional and contemporary anthropological topics, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment. Thematic questions addressed in the class include: what is an alien? What is "the human"? Could SF be possible without anthropology?

Starts : 2006-02-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Physical Sciences Atmospheric Earth MIT OpenCourseWare Planetary Sciences Undergraduate

This course focuses on the practical applications of the continuum concept for deformation of solids and fluids, emphasizing force balance. Topics include stress tensor, infinitesimal and finite strain, and rotation tensors. Constitutive relations applicable to geological materials, including elastic, viscous, brittle, and plastic deformation are studied.

Starts : 2006-02-01
18 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Health and Welfare Athletics MIT OpenCourseWare Physical Education and Recreation Undergraduate

This 12 session course is designed for the beginning or novice archer and uses recurve indoor target bows and equipment. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic techniques of indoor target archery emphasizing the care and use of equipment, range safety, stance and shooting techniques, scoring and competition.

Starts : 2005-09-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This class investigates the use of computers in architectural design and construction. It begins with a pre-prepared design computer model, which is used for testing and process investigation in construction. It then explores the process of construction from all sides of the practice: detail design, structural design, and both legal and computational issues.

Starts : 2012-09-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Engineering Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This is the second undergraduate architecture design studio, which introduces design logic and skills that enable design thinking, representation, and development. Through the lens of nano-scale machines, technologies, and phenomena, students are asked to explore techniques for describing form, space, and architecture. Exercises encourage various connotations of the "machine" and challenge students to translate conceptual strategies into more integrated design propositions through both digital and analog means.

Starts : 2002-09-01
6 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

4.125 is the third undergraduate design studio. This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models.

Starts : 2005-09-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models.

This class was taught concurrently with 4.125B. Some of the assignments are the same, some are different, and the sites for the final project are different. But since they were taught in tandem, it would be useful to look at both together.

Starts : 2005-09-01
21 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This subject introduces skills needed to build within a landscape establishing continuities between the built and natural world. Students learn to build appropriately through analysis of landscape and climate for a chosen site, and to conceptualize design decisions through drawings and models.

This class was taught concurrently with course 4.125A. Some of the assignments are the same, some are different, and the sites for the final project are different. But since they were taught in tandem, it would be useful to look at both together.

Starts : 2005-02-01
17 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Visual & Performing Arts Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This is the second undergraduate design studio. It introduces a full range of architectural ideas and issues through drawing exercises, analyses of precedents, and explored design methods. Students will develop design skills by conceptualizing and representing architectural ideas and making aesthetic judgments about building design. Discussions regarding architecture's role in mediating culture, nature and technology will help develop the students' architectural vocabulary.

Starts : 2005-02-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts MIT OpenCourseWare Special Programs Undergraduate

This seminar introduces, through studio projects, the basic principles regarding the use of color in the visual arts. Students explore a range of topics, including the historical uses of color in the arts, the interactions between colors, and the psychology of color.

Starts : 2005-02-01
1 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts MIT OpenCourseWare Special Programs Undergraduate

This seminar introduces, through studio projects, the basic principles regarding the use of color in the visual arts. Students explore a range of topics, including the historical uses of color in the arts, the interactions between colors, and the psychology of color.

Starts : 2005-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Experimental Study Group MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This seminar introduces, through studio projects, the basic principles regarding the use of color in the visual arts. Students explore a range of topics, including the historical uses of color in the arts, the interactions between colors, and the psychology of color.

Starts : 2010-09-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Architecture MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" — art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world.

Starts : 2013-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Anthropology MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course examines how people learn, practice, and evaluate traditional and contemporary craft techniques. Social science theories of design, embodiment, apprenticeship learning, skill, labor, expertise, and tacit knowledge are used to explore distinctions and connections among art, craft, and science. We will also discuss the commoditization of craft into market goods, collectible art, and tourism industries. Ethnographic and historical case studies include textiles, glassblowing, quilting, cheese making, industrial design, home cooking, factory and laboratory work, CAD-CAM. In-class demonstrations and hands-on craft projects will be included.

Starts : 2010-09-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Computer Sciences Electrical Engineering and Computer Science MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course introduces students to the basic knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning methods of artificial intelligence. Upon completion of 6.034, students should be able to develop intelligent systems by assembling solutions to concrete computational problems; understand the role of knowledge representation, problem solving, and learning in intelligent-system engineering; and appreciate the role of problem solving, vision, and language in understanding human intelligence from a computational perspective.

Starts : 2012-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Global Studies and Languages MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Asia in the Modern World: Images and Representations examines visual representations of Asia, interpreting them from both historical and modern contexts. This course is based around using the Visualizing Cultures website. Case studies focus on Japan and China from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries.

Starts : 2012-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Global Studies and Languages MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Asia in the Modern World: Images and Representations examines visual representations of Asia, interpreting them from both historical and modern contexts. This course is based around using the Visualizing Cultures website. Case studies focus on Japan and China from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries.

Starts : 2012-02-01
No votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Closed [?] Ethnic Studies Foreign Languages and Literatures MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

Asia in the Modern World: Images and Representations examines visual representations of Asia, interpreting them from both historical and modern contexts. This course is based around using the Visualizing Cultures website. Case studies focus on Japan and China from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries.

Starts : 2013-09-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Comparative Media Studies/Writing MIT OpenCourseWare Undergraduate

This course focuses on novels and films from the last twenty-five years (nominally 1985–2010) marked by their relationship to extreme violence and transgression. Our texts will focus on serial killers, torture, rape, and brutality, but they also explore notions of American history, gender and sexuality, and reality television—sometimes, they delve into love or time or the redemptive role of art in late modernity. Our works are a motley assortment, with origins in the U.S., France, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Japan and South Korea. The broad global era marked by this period is one of acceleration, fragmentation, and late capitalism; however, we will also consider national specificities of violent representation, including particulars like the history of racism in the United States, the role of politeness in bourgeois Austrian culture, and the effect of Japanese manga on vividly graphic contemporary Asian cinema.

We will explore the politics and aesthetics of the extreme; affective questions about sensation, fear, disgust, and shock; and problems of torture, pain, and the unrepresentable. We will ask whether these texts help us understand violence, or whether they frame violence as something that resists comprehension; we will consider whether form mitigates or colludes with violence. Finally, we will continually press on the central term in the title of this course: what, specifically, is violence? (Can we only speak of plural "violences"?) Is violence the same as force? Do we know violence when we see it? Is it something knowable or does it resist or even destroy knowledge? Is violence a matter for a text's content—who does what, how, and to whom—or is it a problem of form: shock, boredom, repetition, indeterminacy, blankness? Can we speak of an aesthetic of violence? A politics or ethics of violence? Note the question that titles our last week: Is it the case that we are what we see? If so, what does our obsession with ultraviolence mean, and how does contemporary representation turn an accusing gaze back at us?

Trusted paper writing service WriteMyPaper.Today will write the papers of any difficulty.