Courses tagged with "Saylor.org" (363)

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No votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art Appreciation and Techniques Art History

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. In this course, you will learn how to develop a five-step system for understanding visual art in all forms, based on the following: Description: A work of art from an objective point of view its physical attributes, and formal construction. Analysis: A detailed look at a work of art that combines physical attributes with subjective statements based on the viewer’s reaction to the work. Context: Historical, religious, or environmental information that surrounds a particular work of art and which helps to understand the work’s meaning. Meaning: A statement of the work’s content. A message or narrative expressed by the subject matter. Judgment: A critical point of view about a work of art concerning its aesthetic or cultur…

No votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art Appreciation and Techniques Art History

Please note: Our faculty members have indicated that several important changes need to be made in order to improve the course and your experience as a student. In 2013, we will be re-releasing this course under the simplified title: ARTH101: Art Appreciation and Techniques. Until then, you are welcome to work through this course at your own leisure; there

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art Appreciation and Techniques Art History

Please note: Our faculty members have indicated that several important changes need to be made in order to improve the course and your experience as a student. In 2013, we will be re-releasing this course under the simplified title: ARTH101: Art Appreciation and Techniques. Until then, you are welcome to work through this course at your own leisure; there

1 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Social Sciences Art History

In this course, we will study the history of Western art, beginning with the first objects created by prehistoric humans around 20,000 years ago and ending with the art and architecture of the High Gothic period in fourteenth-century Europe.  The information presented in this course will provide you with the tools to recognize important works of art and historical styles, as well as to understand the historical context and cultural developments of Western art history through the end of the medieval period.  Introductory readings paired with detailed lectures will provide you with a well-rounded sense of the history, art, and culture of the West up through the medieval period. At the end of this course, you will be able to identify key works of art and artistic periods in Western history.  You will also be able to discuss the development of stylistic movements and relate those developments to important historical events.  Completion of this course will prepare you for ARTH111, which surveys the history o…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

In this course, we will study important movements and some influential artists in Western art history.  We will begin with the “Proto-Renaissance” in Italy in the 13th century and continue through to the late 20th century.  You will become acquainted with certain regional and personal styles of art through this period, as well as a number of renowned works of art and architecture. Art forms and imagery are influenced by the surrounding world, the biography of the artist who produced the artwork, and other circumstances of artistic production.  This course provides a framework for considering how and why certain artistic movements emerged in certain places at certain times.  Some of the names and works we will look at might already be familiar to you, while others will be new.  The ultimate goal of this course is not to provide data on individual works of art, although that is part of art history, but to act as a sort of springboard.  You will gain tools for looking at and analyzing not only art by…

No votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course serves as an introduction to the major artistic and architectural traditions of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East.  This course will explore how artifacts and monuments can be used to study the history and culture of the ancient world.  It is divided into two units that chronologically focus on the art, architecture, and archaeology of each region.  The first unit examines Ancient Egyptian tombs, monuments, and art from the Early Dynastic (c. 3100-2650 BCE) through the Roman (30 BCE- 4thcentury CE) periods.  The second unit focuses on Ancient Near Eastern artistic and architectural traditions from the late Neolithic (c. 9500-4500 BCE) through the conquest of the Achaemenid Persian Empire (550-330 BCE) by Alexander the Great. After completing this course, you will be able to identify the major characteristics of Egyptian and Near Eastern art and architecture, more specifically what types of objects and buildings were made and used by Egyptians and Ancient Near Eastern peoples.  You wil…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

In this course, we will study the art of Classical Antiquity.  The different units of the course reflect the main chronological stages in art development in Ancient Greece and Rome, from the coming together of the Greek city-state and the emergence of “geometric art” (around 900 B.C.) to the fourth century A.D. shift that took place within Roman culture and art due to the growing influence of Christianity.  We will begin by underlining the unity of our subject matter: Rome not only conquered Greece, but it assimilated Greece’s cultural and artistic accomplishments.  In fact, much of what we know of Greek art today we learned through Roman copies. We will also explore the development of Greek architecture, sculpture, and painting up to the Hellenistic period, when Greek art began to influence new parts of the globe through the conquests of Alexander the Great.  We will also study the ways in which naturalism and idealism came together as Greek art developed over time.  Next, we will turn our atten…

6 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

In this course, we will focus on becoming “literate” in the art of the Italian Renaissance, on identifying the effects that the Renaissance had on the arts of Italy, and discovering the ways in which specific historical developments impacted those arts from the end of the thirteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century.  The Renaissance, a European phenomenon that began to develop in the late thirteenth century, refers to a marked shift in the ways in which individuals perceived their world.  A new outlook was emergingone that was characterized by, among other things, increased humanism and a renewed interest in the cultures of Classical Antiquity (and all within a Christian framework).  There is no specific date that marks the beginning of the Renaissance, but its burgeoning effects on art can be detected earlier in Italy than in other areas.  The late thirteenth and fourteenth centuries in Italy are consequently referred to as the “Proto-Renaissance” and will constitute our first unit of…

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course will examine the history of Western art from approximately 1600 to approximately 1800a period that bridges the gap from the Renaissance to the earliest days of the Modern era. Beginning with the Baroque in Counter-Reformation Italy and concluding with Neoclassicism in the late 18th century, we will trace the stylistic developments in Europe and America through a variety of religious, political, and philosophical movements. The class begins with the Baroque, which was the immediate successor to the Renaissance and to Renaissance humanism, and we will examine this period by regions (Italy and Spain, the Netherlands, and France and England). Next, the course moves on to explore the development of two opposing styles that emerged in the 18th century: Rococo and Enlightenment art. The course culminates with Neoclassical art, its development in a politically turbulent France, and its spread into other Western cultures, including Italy, England, and the United States. Crucial to this course is the emer…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

In this course, you will study the various artistic movements that comprise 19th- and 20th-century modern art. You will examine several dozen artists, all of whom helped define their respective artistic styles and eras through their innovative approaches to representation, artistic space, and the role of the artist in society. Each unit will cover a significant period in the history of modern art and explore the ways in which both the principal figures from each period and the corresponding movements challenged the limits of art through the incorporation of modern life, as each artist addresses the political, philosophical, and personal implications of “modernity” and how it relates to the production of artwork. This course will begin with a brief review of the artists and movements that immediately preceded French Impressionism and will then take an in-depth look at the key artists and characteristics of Impressionism, widely considered the first “modern” art movement. You will then spend time read…

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course explores the history of the artistic developments of the 20th century in Western Europe and the United States. The art of this period is characterized by extraordinary experimentation and innovation in styles, materials, techniques, and modes of dissemination. In addition to painting and sculpture, the 20th century witnessed the rise in popularity of photography, collage, montage, installations, earth art, performance, and conceptual art. Artists were sometimes inspired by the works of past masters but also often by contemporary changes in intellectual thought and social conditions. Therefore, we will examine the intellectual and cultural beliefs that this art both reflects and helped shape. Despite the great variety of artistic styles and theories that we will examine, a number of important themes consistently recur. If you keep them in mind as you progress through the course, you will find it easier to organize your thoughts and make meaningful comparisons among various artists, movements, and…

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century.  We will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity.  We will move chronologically, more or less, with many overlaps and cross-chronological, thematic diversions that will help shape this overview and offer different perspectives on the notion of an “American art,” per se. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century.  A background in the basic concepts and terms of art history and art practice, and/or American studies in other disciplines, w…

No votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course is an introduction to the major methodologies that have been and are used by art historians.  Although not a history of art history per se, it is organized in a roughly chronological order that traces major methodological developments within the discipline from the birth of art history in the nineteenth century through the late twentieth century.  By focusing on several outstanding historical and critical readings, as well as secondary discussions of different types of art historical analysis, the student will be introduced to some of the major methodologies that have shaped the field: formalism, biographical analysis, connoisseurship, technical analysis, iconographical analysis, psychoanalysis, Marxism and the social history of art, feminism, post-colonialism, and semiotics.  The course will also examine how artworks are displayed in modern art museums. After completing this course, you will be able to explain the strengths and weaknesses of different art historical methodologies and explain…

3 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course serves as an introduction to the pre-modern Islamic artistic traditions of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Central and South Asia.  This course is organized around the major dynasties under which Islamic art and architecture were produced.  The first unit surveys core Islamic beliefs, the basic characteristics of Islamic art and architecture, and art and architecture created under the patronage of the Umayyads (632-750) and the Muslim rulers of Spain.  The second unit focuses on the artistic and architectural innovations of the Abbasids (738-1250) and Seljuks (c.1040-1157), as well as the regional rulers of Anatolia and the Maghreb.  The third unit looks at the art and architecture of three successive Islamic dynasties based in Egypt: the Fatimids (909-1171), Ayyubids (1171-1250), and Mamluks (1250-1517). Unit 4 examines the art and architecture of the Ilkhanid (1256-1353) and Timurid (c. 1370-1507) dynasties in Iran and Central Asia.  The final unit presents the art and architecture of thr…

5 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course will introduce you to the art and architecture of the African continent from the prehistoric to the present. The objects, images, and sites featured in this course represent a small cross-section of the diverse ethnic and artistic heritage in Africa. This course emphasizes the role of art as manifested in the lifestyles, spiritualities, and philosophies of particular African societies, while also breaching aesthetic principles and the study and display of African art. Many works produced in Africa are used for spiritual purposes that include ritual and performance. The study of masks and ceremonies will enable you to become more familiar with the significant role art plays in the everyday lives of the citizens of African nations. For example, most traditional African art was not meant to be displayed, but rather viewed in use and in motion, especially in mixed-media masquerades. Body adornment and textiles have long been important forms of visual communication and expression in Africa, whereas pai…

5 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course serves as an introduction to the major pre-Modern artistic traditions of India, China, and Japan.  It is organized into three units that focus on the art and architecture of India, China, and Japan respectively.  Each unit is structured chronologically.  Unit 1 examines Indian Art from the Indus Valley Civilization (c. 2600-1900 BCE) through the art of the Mughal Empire (1526-1858), focusing on Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic art and architecture.  Unit 2 covers the arts of China from the Shang Dynasty (c.1600-1050 BCE) through the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), detailing the interaction between art, politics, and culture throughout Chinese dynastic history.  Unit 3 introduces Japanese Art from the Jomon Period (c.10,500-300 BCE) through the Edo Period (1615-1868), exploring the effects that various sub-traditions and sub-cultures (Tang Dynasty China, Buddhism, and the warrior class) had on the art of Japan. After completing this course, you will have a comprehensive understanding of the arts and a…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

A chronological and thematic survey of the major themes and developments in the history of Latin American art, this course traces the evolution of visual culture over approximately four millennia.  Organized into three parts, the course begins with the pre-Columbian period (1800 BC to AD 1492), moves into the years of European contact and conquest (AD 1492 to 1800), and concludes with an overview of modern and contemporary art across the Americas.  You will learn to identify and describe works of art and discuss the broader historical and social contexts in which they were produced and circulated. The first part of the course will introduce you to the major artistic achievements and archaeological record of the ancient Mesoamerican and Andean cultures: monumental architecture, urban planning, painting, sculpture, and portable arts.  The study of colonial art focuses on Mexico, Peru, and Brazil, introducing concepts of artistic hybridity and diversity, indigenous and national cultures, and transatlantic e…

4 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

In this course, we will study the history of Eastern (Orthodox) Christian art.  The course begins with an overview of the emergence of Christianity in the Late Antique period and the formation of the Christian visual language that grew out of the Classical tradition.  The course then follows the development of Christian art after the fall of the Roman Empire and the emergence of a “new Rome” in the East: the Byzantine Empire.  A series of reading assignments paired with lectures and virtual tours will introduce you to important works of Early Christian and Byzantine art and will also give you an understanding of the central debates of Early Christian and Byzantine art historical scholarship. By the time you finish the course, you will be able to identify the most important artworks from this period and understand how their appearances relate to the social, political, and religious environment in which they were produced.  You will also be able to trace the ways in which Early Christian and Byzantine…

6 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History

This course serves as an introduction to the Buddhist artistic traditions of South, Southeast, and East Asia, as well as the Himalayas.  It is organized into four units based on the development of Buddhist schools and artistic traditions in Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, and China, Korea, and Japan.  The first unit surveys the core tenets of Buddhism, Buddhist iconography, and early Buddhist art and architecture in India.  The second unit reviews the development of Buddhist art and architecture in Southeast Asia, focusing on the patronage of Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism by rulers in the modern countries of Indonesia, Cambodia, Myanmar, and Thailand.  Unit three examines the particular form of Vajrayana Buddhism and its artistic traditions that developed in the Himalayas.  The final unit traces the spread of Mahayana Buddhist art and architecture into China and later into Korea and Japan via the Silk Roads.  All four units highlight the interaction between Buddhist doctrine, art, and architecture; Bud…

7 votes
Saylor.org Free Closed [?] Visual & Performing Arts Art History Contemporary Art

In common conversation, we often use the phrase “contemporary art” to refer to current artistic productionthe art being produced today.  However, in the art history field, the phrase denotes a specific period of art and artistic practice starting in the 1960s and continuing today.  It is characterized by a break from the modernist artistic canon and a desire to move away from the dominant Western cultural model, looking for inspiration in everyday and popular culture.  More specifically, many contemporary artworks reject traditional modernistic artistic media (such as painting or sculpture) in favor of a more collaborative, ephemeral, and multimedia approach that further blurs the boundaries between high and mass culture.  In its subject matter, this art also tends to reflect a shift away from purely aesthetic issues to more socially oriented concerns.  Finally, it is important to note that contemporary art should not be seen as a progression of different artistic styles but as series of different cu…