Courses tagged with "Graduate" (6)

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Starts : 2004-09-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Computer Sciences Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare

The Acoustics of Speech and Hearing is an H-Level graduate course that reviews the physical processes involved in the production, propagation and reception of human speech. Particular attention is paid to how the acoustics and mechanics of the speech and auditory system define what sounds we are capable of producing and what sounds we can sense. Areas of discussion include:

  1. the acoustic cues used in determining the direction of a sound source,
  2. the acoustic and mechanical mechanisms involved in speech production and
  3. the acoustic and mechanical mechanism used to transduce and analyze sounds in the ear.

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Starts : 2005-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course focuses on phonological phenomena that are sensitive to morphological structure, including base-reduplicant identity, cyclicity, level ordering, derived environment effects, opaque rule interactions, and morpheme structure constraints. In the recent OT literature, it has been claimed that all of these phenomena can be analyzed with a single theoretical device: correspondence constraints, which regulate the similarity of lexically related forms (such as input and output, base and derivative, base and reduplicant).

Starts : 2009-02-01
18 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as to which topics to cover.

This year, we will focus on topics having to do with modality, conditionals, tense, and aspect.

Starts : 2007-02-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is a continuation of 24.951. This semester the course topics of interest include movement, phrase structure, and the architecture of the grammar.

Starts : 2004-02-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free English & Literature Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Urban Studies and Planning

The purpose of this seminar is to expose the student to a number of different types of writing that one may encounter in a professional career. The class is an opportunity to write, review, rewrite and present a point of view both orally and in written form. 
 

Starts : 2003-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is a detailed investigation of the major issues and problems in the study of lexical argument structure and how it determines syntactic structure. Its empirical scope  is along three dimensions: typology, lexical class, and theoretical framework. The range of linguistic types include English, Japanese, Navajo, and Warlpiri. Lexical classes include those of Levin's English Verb Classes and others producing emerging work on diverse languages. The theoretical emphasis of this course is on structural relations among elements of argument structure.