Courses tagged with "Graduate" (2)

Sort by: Name, Rating, Price
Start time: Any, Upcoming, Recent started, New, Always Open
Price: Any, Free, Paid
Starts : 2004-09-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Social Sciences Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course examines the causes and consequences of American foreign policy since 1898. Course readings cover both substantive and methods topics. Four substantive topics are covered:

  1. major theories of American foreign policy;
  2. major episodes in the history of American foreign policy and historical/interpretive controversies about them;
  3. the evaluation of major past American foreign policies--were their results good or bad? and
  4. current policy controversies, including means of evaluating proposed policies.

Three methods topics are covered:

  1. basic social scientific inference--what are theories? what are good theories? how should theories be framed and tested?
  2. historical investigative methodology, including archival research, and, most importantly,
  3. case study methodology.

Historical episodes covered in the course are used as raw material for case studies, asking "if these episodes were the subject of case studies, how should those studies be performed, and what could be learned from them?"

Starts : 2003-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Public Affairs & Law Graduate MIT OpenCourseWare Political Science

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions:

  • Does justice require granting group-differentiated rights?
  • Do group-differentiated rights conflict with liberal and democratic commitments to equality and justice for all citizens?
  • What, if anything, can hold a multi-religious, multicultural society together? Why should the citizens of such a society want to hold together?

Related Content

Trusted paper writing service WriteMyPaper.Today will write the papers of any difficulty.