Courses tagged with "Graduate" (19)

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Starts : 2005-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course focuses on phonological phenomena that are sensitive to morphological structure, including base-reduplicant identity, cyclicity, level ordering, derived environment effects, opaque rule interactions, and morpheme structure constraints. In the recent OT literature, it has been claimed that all of these phenomena can be analyzed with a single theoretical device: correspondence constraints, which regulate the similarity of lexically related forms (such as input and output, base and derivative, base and reduplicant).

Starts : 2009-02-01
18 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is the second of the three parts of our graduate introduction to semantics. The others are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.954 Pragmatics in Linguistic Theory. Like the other courses, this one is not meant as an overview of the field and its current developments. Our aim is to help you to develop the ability for semantic analysis, and we think that exploring a few topics in detail together with hands-on practical work is more effective than offering a bird's-eye view of everything. Once you have gained some experience in doing semantic analysis, reading around in the many recent handbooks and in current issues of major journals and attending our seminars and colloquia will give you all you need to prosper. Because we want to focus, we need to make difficult choices as to which topics to cover.

This year, we will focus on topics having to do with modality, conditionals, tense, and aspect.

Starts : 2007-02-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is a continuation of 24.951. This semester the course topics of interest include movement, phrase structure, and the architecture of the grammar.

Starts : 2003-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is a detailed investigation of the major issues and problems in the study of lexical argument structure and how it determines syntactic structure. Its empirical scope  is along three dimensions: typology, lexical class, and theoretical framework. The range of linguistic types include English, Japanese, Navajo, and Warlpiri. Lexical classes include those of Levin's English Verb Classes and others producing emerging work on diverse languages. The theoretical emphasis of this course is on structural relations among elements of argument structure.

Starts : 2004-02-01
12 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course will consider the claim that there is no such thing as race, with a particular emphasis on the question whether races should be thought of as natural kinds: is our concept of race a natural kind concept? Is the term 'race' a natural kind term? If so, is Appiah right to conclude that there are no races? How should one go about "analyzing" the concept of race?

Starts : 2003-02-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is designed to allow participants to engage in the exploration of the grammatical structure of a language that is unknown to them (and typically to the instructors as well). In some ways it simulates traditional field methods research. In terms of format, we work in both group and individual meetings with the consultant. Each student identifies some grammatical construction (e.g. wh questions, agreement, palatalization, interrogative intonation) to focus their research: they elicit and share data and write a report on the material gathered that is to be turned in at the end of the term. Ideally, we can put together a volume of grammatical sketches.

The first three to four weeks of the term, our group meetings will explore the basic phonology, morphology and surface syntax for a first pass overview of the language, looking for interesting areas to be explored in more detail later. During this period individual sessions can review material from the general session as well as explore new areas. At roughly the fifth meeting, individual students (typically two to three per session) guide the group elicitations to explore their research topic.

Starts : 2014-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course serves as an introduction to the current research questions in phonological theory. Topics include metrical and prosodic structure, features and their phonetic basis in speech, acquisition and parsing, phonological domains, morphology, and language change and reconstruction. Activities include problem solving, squibs, and data collection.

Starts : 2003-09-01
16 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is concerned with the concepts and principles which have been of central significance in the recent development of syntactic theory, with special focus on the "Government and Binding" (GB) / "Principles and Parameters" (P&P) / "Minimalist Program" (MP) approach.

It is the first of a series of two courses (24.951 is taught during the Fall and 24.952 is taught in the Spring). This course deals mostly with phrase structure, argument structure and its syntactic expression, including "A-movement". Though other issues (e.g. wh-movement, antecedent-contained deletion, extraposition) may be mentioned during the semester, the course will not systematically investigate these topics in class until 24.952.

The goal of the course is to understand why certain problems have been treated in certain ways. Thus, on many occasions a variety of approaches will be discussed, and the (recent) historical development of these approaches are emphasized.

Starts : 2005-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is a study of speech sounds: how we produce and perceive them and their acoustic properties. It explores the influence of the production and perception systems on phonological patterns and sound change. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques are also discussed.

Starts : 2010-02-01
10 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is the third and final part of our graduate introduction to semantics. The other two classes are 24.970 Introduction to Semantics and 24.973 Advanced Semantics. The semester will be divided into somewhat independent units. One unit will be devoted to conversational implicatures (mainly scalar implicatures) and another to presupposition. In each unit, we will discuss basic concepts and technical tools and then devote some time to recent work which illustrates their application.

Starts : 2013-09-01
9 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is an intensive seminar on the foundations of analytic philosophy for first-year graduate students. A large selection of classic texts, such as Frege's Foundations of Arithmetic, Russell's Problems of Philosophy, and Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations, is covered in this course.

Starts : 2007-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course will investigate the semantics of generic sentences, i.e., sentences that are used to talk about habits, tendencies, dispositions, or kinds. For instance:

  1. Dogs are good pets.
  2. The giant panda is an endangered species.
  3. A soccer player makes lots of money.
  4. Mary smokes after dinner.
  5. This machine crushes oranges.

This is a half-semester course.

Starts : 2006-02-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course presents a comparison of different proposed architectures for the syntax module of grammar. The subject traces several themes across a wide variety of approaches, with emphasis on testable differences among models. Models discussed include ancient and medieval proposals, structuralism, early generative grammar, generative semantics, government-binding theory/minimalism, LFG, HPSG, TAG, functionalist perspectives and others.

Starts : 2007-02-01
7 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course provides an overview of the distinctive features which distinguish sound categories of languages of the world. Theories which relate these categories to their acoustic and articulatory correlates, both universally and in particular languages, are covered. Models of word recognition by listeners, features, and phonological structure are also discussed. In addition, the course offers a variety of perspectives on these issues, drawn from Electrical Engineering, Linguistics and Cognitive Science.

Starts : 2015-09-01
13 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course is a graduate seminar surveying recent work on self-knowledge. Some questions that will be explored and discussed are: What is the distinctive philosophical interest of self-knowledge? Is self-knowledge really an epistemic achievement? Is it plausible that there is a uniform explanation of all distinctively first-personal self-knowledge?

Starts : 2009-02-01
14 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

The seminar will be devoted to understanding what we're up to when we ascribe contents to a person's assertions and mental attitudes. We seek to make clear the rules of the game for the philosophy of language. We'll survey classic discussions of the issue by Field, Lewis and Stalnaker. But much of the emphasis of the class will be on getting clear about the limitations of our theoretical tools. I'd like to focus on places where our theorizing runs into trouble, or breaks down altogether.

Starts : 2006-09-01
11 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This course offers an advanced survey of current debates about the ontology, methodology, and aims of the social sciences.

Starts : 2006-09-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

Many details of phonetic realization cannot be predicted from standard phonological representations on a language-independent basis, so phonetic realization must be specified in grammar. In this seminar we will investigate phonetic realization as a component of grammar.

The basic questions that we will address are:

  • What is the form of the phonetic realization component?
  • What is its relationship to phonology?

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Starts : 2002-09-01
15 votes
MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) Free Philosophy, Religion, & Theology Graduate Linguistics and Philosophy MIT OpenCourseWare

This seminar will investigate the expression of gradability, comparison and degree in natural language. The course will address the following major issues, though we may also include other topics according to the interests and direction of the class:

  • The underlying semantic representation of expressions of degree and the linguistic significance of scalar representations
  • The logical form of comparative constructions, and the implications of comparatives for other aspects of the grammar
  • The semantics of degree and the role of scalar representations in grammatical categories other than gradable adjectives

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